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Enzymatic glucose biosensor based on bismuth nanoribbons electrochemically deposited on reduced graphene oxide

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Abstract

We describe the electrochemical preparation of bismuth nanoribbons (Bi-NRs) with an average length of 100 ± 50 nm and a width of 10 ± 5 μm by a potentiostatic method. The process occurs on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) in the presence of disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetate that acts as a scaffold for the growth of the Bi-NRs and also renders them more stable. The method was applied to the preparation of Bi-NRs incorporated into reduced graphene oxide. This nanocomposite was loaded with the enzyme glucose oxidase onto a glassy carbon electrode. The resulting biosensor displays an enhanced redox peak for the enzyme with a peak-to-peak separation of about 28 mV, revealing a fast electron transfer at the modified electrode. The loading of the GCE with electroactive GOx was calculated to be 8.54 × 10−10 mol∙cm−2, and the electron transfer rate constant is 4.40 s−1. Glucose can be determined (in the presence of oxygen) at a relatively working potential of −0.46 V (vs. Ag|AgCl) in the 0.5 to 6 mM concentration range, with a 104 μM lower detection limit. The sensor also displays appreciable repeatability, reproducibility and remarkable stability. It was successfully applied to the determination of glucose in human serum samples.

A potentiostatic method was used to prepare reduced graphene oxide and bismuth nanoribbons nanocomposite on a glassy carbon electrode. This nanocomposite was loaded with enzyme glucose oxidase to fabricate a glucose biosensor.

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Acknowledgments

This project was supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Ministry of Education of Taiwan (Republic of China). Research supported by the King Saud University, Deanship of Scientific Research, College of Science- Research Center.

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Correspondence to Shen-Ming Chen or Bih-Show Lou.

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Devasenathipathy, R., Karthik, R., Chen, SM. et al. Enzymatic glucose biosensor based on bismuth nanoribbons electrochemically deposited on reduced graphene oxide. Microchim Acta 182, 2165–2172 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00604-015-1545-1

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