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Oral oxycodone plus intravenous acetaminophen versus intravenous morphine sulfate in acute bone fracture pain control: a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial

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European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology Aims and scope Submit manuscript

Abstract

Objectives

Bone fracture is a common cause of acute pain in emergency and orthopedics departments. Targeting the multifaceted mechanisms of pain with combinations of multiple analgesics (multimodal analgesia) can increase the pain control efforts efficacy and decrease the adverse effects of each medication.

Methods

One hundred and fifty-three patients with acute bone fracture were randomly allocated to two groups receiving intravenous morphine sulfate (74 patients) or oral oxycodone plus intravenous acetaminophen (79 patients). Pain scores and drugs’ adverse effects were assessed 10, 30 and 60 min after treatment.

Results

Pain scores were similar between groups before, 30 and 60 min after medication but patients in morphine sulfate group experienced less pain 10 min after medication. Eight (10.8 %) patients in morphine sulfate group and 26 (32.9 %) patients in acetaminophen/oxycodone group experienced nausea that was statistically significant higher (P value = 0.001). Itching was seen in 12 (15.1 %) patients of acetaminophen/oxycodone group and three (4.0 %) patients of patients in morphine sulfate group (P value = 0.02).

Conclusion

Intravenous acetaminophen plus oral oxycodone is as effective as intravenous morphine sulfate in acute pain control in emergency department but with a less desirable safety profile.

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Correspondence to Marzieh Fathi.

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Zare, M.A., Ghalyaie, A.H., Fathi, M. et al. Oral oxycodone plus intravenous acetaminophen versus intravenous morphine sulfate in acute bone fracture pain control: a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol 24, 1305–1309 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00590-013-1392-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00590-013-1392-x

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