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An iatrogenic femoral nerve injury after open reduction and displacement iliac osteotomy for hip dysplasia: a case report

  • K. ErtemEmail author
  • Y. Karakoç
  • A. Cetin
  • A. Bora
Case Report

Abstract

In this report, we present a 4-year-old female patient who came to our clinic complaining of symptoms that were then attributed to a right femoral nerve injury, 15 months after open reduction, and innominate osteotomy operations performed at another orthopedic center. The operations were performed using the Smith–Peterson incision technique and led to a neurotmetic femoral nerve injury. In our clinic, we repaired damaged femoral nerve by sural nerve graft using interfascicular technique. After 6 years, she was walking without additional device or hand to stabilize the knee.

Keywords

Congenital hip dislocation Peripheral nerve Femoral nerve injury 

Notes

Conflict of interest statement

No funds were received in support of this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of MedicineInonu UniversityMalatyaTurkey
  2. 2.Department of Physiology, Faculty of MedicineInonu UniversityMalatyaTurkey
  3. 3.Department of Anatomy, Faculty of MedicineInonu UniversityMalatyaTurkey
  4. 4.Department of Orthopaedics and TraumatologyIzmir Ataturk Training and Research HospitalIzmirTurkey

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