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Preoperative patient activation is predictive of improvements in patient-reported outcomes following minimally invasive lumbar decompression

Abstract

Purpose

To determine whether there is an association between preoperative 10-Item Patient Activation Measure (PAM-10) scores and clinical outcomes following MIS LD.

Methods

Patients undergoing a primary MIS LD were retrospectively reviewed and stratified according to their preoperative PAM-10 scores: “low PAM,” “moderate PAM,” and “high PAM.” Preoperative PAM score cohorts were tested for improvements in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), 12-Item Short-Form Physical Component Score (SF-12 PCS), and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) back and leg pain using multivariate linear regression.

Results

Eighty-nine patients were included: 29 had a low PAM score, 32 had a moderate PAM score, and 28 had a high PAM score. Cohorts experienced similar preoperative VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, ODI, and SF-12 PCS. Patients with low PAM scores experienced a trend of higher pain scores throughout 6 months with VAS back pain being significant at 3 months and VAS leg pain being significant at 6-week and 3-month follow-up. Patients with lower PAM scores experienced a worse improvement in ODI at 6-week, 3-month, and 6-month timepoints. Lastly, patients with lower PAM scores demonstrated less improvement in SF-12 PCS at 3-month and 6-month follow-up.

Conclusions

Lower preoperative PAM scores were associated with worse improvement in clinical outcomes following MIS LD. Patients with lower PAM scores had diminished improvement in long-term patient-reported outcomes including ODI, SF-12, and VAS back and leg pain. Our investigation suggests that preoperative PAM assessments may be an effective tool to predict postoperative outcomes following MIS LD.

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Correspondence to Kern Singh.

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Jenkins, N.W., Parrish, J.M., Mohan, S. et al. Preoperative patient activation is predictive of improvements in patient-reported outcomes following minimally invasive lumbar decompression. Eur Spine J 29, 2222–2230 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00586-020-06512-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00586-020-06512-6

Keywords

  • 10-Item Patient Activation Measure
  • PAM-10
  • Clinical outcomes
  • Minimally invasive lumbar decompression
  • MIS LD