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Effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on cutaneous regeneration and wound healing in dogs treated with dexamethasone

Abstract

To evaluate the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on cutaneous regeneration and wound healing in dogs treated with dexamethasone, the present study was undertaken. Under general anesthesia, six full-thickness skin wounds were created on the back of five male adult dogs symmetrically. Left side wounds were left without any treatment, and right side wounds were treated topically with PRP jelly. Six days before creating the wounds, dogs received dexamethasone, 0.5 mg/kg IM, and every other day up to day 8 after wounding. For macroscopic evaluation, digital photographs were taken from wounds. In days 10, 17, and 24 after wounding, skin biopsies were taken from the center and corner of each wounds for hydroxyproline measurement and histopathological evaluation. No significant difference was seen in the percentage of wound contraction, epithelialization, and healing between test and control groups during the study (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences between median of hydroxyproline levels between left and right wounds in dogs treated with dexamethasone (P > 0.0.5). There were no significant differences between median of epithelialization, inflammatory cell infiltration, presence of dermal granulation tissue, fibroblast proliferation, arrangement of fibroblasts, collagen deposition, and collagen bundle formation scores, in the specimens of left and right wounds (P > 0.05). The results of the present study demonstrated that PRP did not have significant effects to promote cutaneous regeneration and wound healing in dogs treated with dexamethasone at least 16 days after last injection.

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Acknowledgment

This study was supported by the research fund of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran (research project number; 3636, 26/10/1386).

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Correspondence to Kamran Sardari.

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Sardari, K., Reza Emami, M., Kazemi, H. et al. Effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on cutaneous regeneration and wound healing in dogs treated with dexamethasone. Comp Clin Pathol 20, 155–162 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00580-010-0972-y

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Keywords

  • Dog
  • Cutaneous wound healing
  • Platelet-rich plasma
  • Growth factor