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Studies on the relationship between haemoglobin, copper, ceruloplasmin, iron, and superoxide dismutase activity in blood of Iranian fat-tailed sheep

Abstract

The relationship between haemoglobin, copper, ceruloplasmin, iron, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in blood of Iranian fat-tailed sheep was studied. Blood samples were taken from the jugular vein of 128 clinically healthy Iranian fat-tailed sheep grouped according to their age (<6, 6–12, 12–24, 24–36 and >36 months) and sex. Age had a significant effect on blood concentrations of haemoglobin, ceruloplasmin and SOD activity (P<0.05). Sex had no significant effect on blood concentrations of haemoglobin, copper, iron, ceruloplasmin and SOD. There was no significant correlation between the concentrations of haemoglobin, copper, iron, ceruloplasmin and SOD. The identification of regulatory mechanisms of copper metabolism in Iranian fat-tailed sheep will require further investigations.

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Nazifi, S., Rowghani, E. & Nikoosefat, Z. Studies on the relationship between haemoglobin, copper, ceruloplasmin, iron, and superoxide dismutase activity in blood of Iranian fat-tailed sheep. Comp Clin Pathol 14, 114–117 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00580-005-0562-6

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Keywords

  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Copper
  • Iron
  • Haemoglobin
  • Superoxide dismutase
  • Iranian fat-tailed sheep