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Repeated fruiting of Japanese golden chanterelle in pot culture with host seedlings

Abstract

Yellow chanterelles are among the most popular wild edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms worldwide. The representative European golden chanterelle, Cantharellus cibarius, has only once been reported to fruit under greenhouse conditions, due to the difficulty of establishing pure culture. Recently, we developed a new technique for establishing a pure culture of a Japanese golden chanterelle (Cantharellus anzutake), and conducted in vitro ectomycorrhizal synthesis using established strains and Pinus densiflora. Acclimated pine mycorrhizal seedlings colonized with C. anzutake in a pot system under laboratory conditions produced small but distinct basidiomata with developed basidiospores. C. anzutake mycorrhizae were established on Quercus serrata seedlings by inoculation of mycorrhizal root tips of the fungus synthesized on P. densiflora. A scaled-up C. anzutake–host system in larger pots (4 L soil volume) exhibited repeated fruiting at 20–24 °C under continuous light illumination at 150 μmol m−2 s−1 during a 2-year incubation period. Therefore, a C. anzutake cultivation trial is practical under controlled environmental conditions.

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Acknowledgments

This study was supported in part by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15H01751 from Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and a general research grant from Institute for Fermentation, Osaka.

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Correspondence to Akiyoshi Yamada.

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Supplementary Fig. 1
figure4

Workflow from ectomycorrhizal synthesis in vitro to the scaled-up 4-L jar system. (PNG 184 kb)

Supplementary Fig. 2
figure5

Morphology and anatomy of Cantharellus anzutake ectomycorrhizae on Pinus densiflora in vitro. Strains EN-51 (ac), EN-52 (df), EN-53 (gi), EN-60 (jl) and EN-61 (mo). External morphology of ectomycorrhizal root tips (a, d, g, j, m), mantle outer layer (b, e, h, k, n), and sectioned root cortex showing Hartig net (c, f, i, l, o). Abbreviations: fungal mantle, fm; Hartig net, hn; tannin cell, tc; cortical cell, cc; endodermal cell, ec. Bars: 20 μm. (PNG 6144 kb)

Supplementary Fig. 3
figure6

The 1-L jar system of ectomycorrhizal seedlings colonized by Cantharellus anzutake. (a) A Pinus densiflora seedling colonized by C-2 (C-2-10), and (b) a Quercus serrata seedling colonized by EN-51 (EN-51-1Q). (c) Fruiting of EN-51 (EN-51Q). The 1-L jar with the oak seedling shoot was temporarily capped with another inverted jar to retain humidity. (d, e) Ectomycorrhizal root tips of EN-51 (EN-51Q) on the oak host: ectomycorrhizal development of the monopodial-pyramidal type on a long root tip (d), and on the lateral roots (e). (PNG 7195 kb)

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Ogawa, W., Takeda, Y., Endo, N. et al. Repeated fruiting of Japanese golden chanterelle in pot culture with host seedlings. Mycorrhiza 29, 519–530 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00572-019-00908-z

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Keywords

  • Cantharellus
  • Edible ectomycorrhizal mushroom
  • Cultivation
  • Symbiosis