Skip to main content

Material flow cost accounting in the light of the traditional cost accounting

Materialflusskostenrechnung im Licht der klassischen Kostenrechnung

Abstract

This article aims at resolving controversies on the role of material flow cost accounting in traditional cost accounting. To this end, we elaborate its complementary use in cost accounting, cost management, and other management areas and thereby highlight its interdisciplinary and attention focusing character.

Zusammenfassung

Ziel dieses Artikels ist es, Kontroversen zur Rolle der Materialflusskostenrechnung in der klassischen Kostenrechnung aufzulösen. Hierzu zeigen wir auf, wie sie Kostenrechnung, Kostenmanagement und andere Managementbereiche sinnvoll ergänzen kann, und heben ihre Stärken bei der interdisziplinären Zusammenarbeit und Schwerpunktsetzung vor.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1

Notes

  1. 1.

    The term “not product output” or “non-product output” is defined by the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC) as follows: “Any quantity stream that leaves an enterprise and is not a product is by definition a non-product output (NPO).” (IFAC 2005, p. 35).

  2. 2.

    Dyckhoff (1992) defines a by-product as an output which is technically inevitable in the production of another output type within the production system, since it is impossible to produce only the one product type alone (Dyckhoff 1992, p. 13). He distinguishes a by-product in a broad sense which from a physical point of view represents the usual case of any production and joint production in a narrow sense which implies producing at least two main or final products of which at least one of them represents a by-product (Dyckhoff 1992, p. 14).

    The main principles of thermodynamics provide a scientific justification for the occurrence of by-products (Oenning 1997, p. 17) because of the entropy increase, physically speaking, each product is also a by-product (Dyckhoff 1992, p. 13). Whether, from an economic point of view, by-products are recognisable at all or are includable in the calculations depends on the operational objectives and the natural and social framework conditions (Dyckhoff 1991, p. 285, quoted by Oenning 1997, p. 19). The idea that by-product production is the normal and not a special case has already been widely accepted (“Most industrial processes are multifunctional” (Guinée et al. 2002, p. 505)), even if traditional production theory has long excluded undesirable by-products such as waste, sewage, or air emissions in order to establish a clean interaction with marketing theory (Dyckhoff 2003, p. 714; Prammer 2009, p. 94).

  3. 3.

    For English literature see e. g. Horngren et al. (2013); Kinney and Raiborn (2012).

  4. 4.

    Strebel argues here that linking purchasing values with the costs of the residues is also problematic. In this case, points which are in principle independent of each other are connected with one another, which suggests the risk of false conclusions in the company policy. However, the occurrence of residues does not mean that it is valid to attribute parts of their production costs, e. g. material costs, to these residues. The costs of a production process are created for the entire by-product package (products and by-products) and, logically, they cannot logically be assigned individually to desired or undesired product types (Strebel 2006, p. 187).

References

  1. Bierer A, Götze U, Meynerts L, Sygulla R (2015) Integrating life cycle costing and life cycle assessment using extended material flow cost accounting. J Clean Prod 108:1289–1301. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.08.036

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Bierer A, Götze U (2012) Energy cost accounting: conventional and flow-oriented approaches. J Compet 4:128–144

    Google Scholar 

  3. Bode A, Bürkle J, Hoffner B, Wisniewski T (2012) Looking at the cost: using flow analysis to assess and improve chemical production processes. Chem Eng Technol 35(8):1504–1514. doi:10.1002/ceat.201200046

    Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Christ KL, Burritt RL (2015) Material Flow Cost Accounting: A Review and Agenda for Future Research. J Clean Prod 108:1378–1389. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.09.005

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Coenenberg AG, Fischer TM, Günther T (2012) Kostenrechnung und Kostenanalyse. Schäffer Poeschel, Stuttgart

    Google Scholar 

  6. Dorn G (1992) Geschichtliche Entwicklung der Kostenrechnung. In: Männel W (ed) Handbuch Kostenrechnung. Gabler, Wiesbaden, pp 97–104

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  7. Dyckhoff H (1991) Berücksichtigung des Umweltschutzes in der betriebswirtschaftlichen Produktionstheorie. In: Ordelheide D, Rudolph B, Büsselmann E (eds) Betriebswirtschaftslehre und ökonomische Theorie. Poeschel, Stuttgart, pp 275–309

  8. Dyckhoff H (1992) Betriebliche Produktion – Theoretische Grundlagen einer umweltorientierten Produktionswirtschaft. Springer, Heidelberg

    Google Scholar 

  9. Dyckhoff H (1993) Berücksichtigung des Umweltschutzes in der betriebswirtschaftlichen Produktionstheorie. In: Seidel E, Strebel H (eds) Betriebliche Umweltökonomie. Springer Fachmedien, Wiesbaden, pp 163–198

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  10. Dyckhoff H (2003) Neukonzeption der Produktionstheorie. Z Betriebswirtsch 73(7):705–732

    Google Scholar 

  11. Ferus M, Jakubczick D (1995) Stoffstrommangement in der Textilindustrie – Ergebnisse einer Fallstudie in einem Textilveredelungsbetrieb. Schriftenreihe des IÖW 93/95, Berlin

    Google Scholar 

  12. Freidank CC (2008) Kostenrechnung – Grundlagen des innerbetrieblichen Rechnungswesens und Konzepte des Kostenmanagements. Oldenbourg, München

    Google Scholar 

  13. Freidank CC, Götze U, Huch B, Weber J (1997) Kostenmanagement – Aktuelle Konzepte und Anwendungen. Springer, Berlin

    Google Scholar 

  14. Friedl B (2010) Kostenrechnung: Grundlagen, Teilrechnungen und Systeme der Kostenrechnung. Oldenbourg, München

    Book  Google Scholar 

  15. Götze U (2010) Kostenrechnung und Kostenmanagement, 5th edn. Springer, Heidelberg

    Book  Google Scholar 

  16. Guinée JB, Gorrée M, Heijungs R (2002) CML 2002. life cycle assessment – an operational guide to the ISO standards, Dordrecht

    Google Scholar 

  17. Günther E, Bergmann A, Rieckhof R (2014) Etablierung betriebswirtschaftlicher Methoden durch Normung. In: Prammer HK (ed) Ressourceneffizientes Wirtschaften: Management der Materialflüsse als Herausforderung für Politik und Unternehmen. Springer Gabler, Wiesbaden, pp 35–53

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  18. Günther E, Wittmann R (1995) Kondukte. Betriebswirtschaft 55(1):119–120

    Google Scholar 

  19. Haberstock L (2008) Kostenrechnung I: Einführung, 13th edn. Erich Schmidt, Berlin

    Google Scholar 

  20. Heupel T, Wendisch N (2003) Green success – process-based environmental cost accounting – implementation in SME’s in Germany. In: Bennett M, Rikhardsson PM, Schaltegger S (eds) Environmental management accounting – purpose and progress. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Netherlands, pp 333–363

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  21. Horngren CT, Datar SM, Foster G, Rajan M (2013) Cost accounting, 14th edn. Prentice Hall, New York

    Google Scholar 

  22. Hueske AK, Guenther E (2015) What hampers innovation? External stakeholders, the organization, groups and individuals: a systematic review of empirical innovation barrier research. Manag Rev Q 65(2):113–148. doi:10.1007/s11301-014-0109-5

    Article  Google Scholar 

  23. IFAC (2005) Environmental management accounting, New York

    Google Scholar 

  24. ISO (2006) Environmental management – Life cycle assessment – Principles and framework (ISO 14040:2006); German and English version EN ISO 14040:2006

    Google Scholar 

  25. ISO (2006) Environmental management – Life cycle assessment – Requirements and guidelines (ISO 14044:2006); German and English version EN ISO 14044:2006

    Google Scholar 

  26. ISO (2011) Environmental management – Material flow cost accounting – General framework (ISO 14051:2011); German and English version EN ISO 14051:2011

    Google Scholar 

  27. Jasch C (2006) How to perform an environmental management cost assessment in one day. J Clean Prod 14(14):1194–1213. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2005.08.005

    Article  Google Scholar 

  28. Kinney MR, Raiborn CR (2012) Cost accounting: foundations and evolutions, 8th edn. South-Western Cengage Learning, Mason

    Google Scholar 

  29. Kokubu K, Tachikawa H (2013) Material flow cost accounting – significance and practical approach. In: Kauffman J, Lee KM (eds) Handbook of sustainable engineering. Springer Reference, Dordrecht, pp 351–369

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  30. Lang C, Steinfeldt M, Loew T, Beucker S, Heubach D, Keil M (2004) Konzepte zur Einführung und Anwendung von Umweltcontrollinginstrumenten in Unternehmen. Endbericht des Forschungsprojekts INTUS. Springer Reference, Stuttgart, Berlin

    Google Scholar 

  31. Letmathe P, Wagner GR (2002) Umweltkostenrechnung. In: Küpper HU, Wagenhofer A (eds) Hand-wörterbuch Unternehmensrechnung und Controlling, 4th edn. Schäffer Poeschel, Stuttgart, pp 1988–1997

    Google Scholar 

  32. Loew T, Fichter K, Müller U, Schultz WF, Strobel M (2003) Ansätze der Umweltkostenrechnung im Vergleich – Vergleichende Beurteilung von Ansätzen der Umweltkostenrechnung auf ihre Eignung für die betriebliche Praxis und ihren Beitrag für eine ökologische Unternehmensführung. Texte 78/03, Berlin

    Google Scholar 

  33. Männel W (1992) Moderne Konzepte der Kostenrechnung. In: Männel W (ed) Handbuch Kostenrechnung. Gabler, Wiesbaden, pp 183–184

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  34. Meadows DH, Meadows D, Randers J, Behrens WW III (1972) The limits to growth: a report for the club of Rome’s project on the predicament of mankind. Universe Books, New York

    Google Scholar 

  35. Möller A (2010) Material and energy flow-based cost accounting. Chem Eng Technol 33(4):567–572. doi:10.1002/ceat.200900491

    Google Scholar 

  36. Mussnig W (1996) Von der Kostenrechnung zum Management Accounting. Deutscher Universitätsverlag, Wiesbaden

    Book  Google Scholar 

  37. Nakajima M (2011) Environmental management accounting for cleaner production – Systemization of material flow cost accounting (MFCA) into corporate management system. Kansai Fre Rev Bus Commer 13:41–63

    Google Scholar 

  38. Nakajima M (2004) On the differences between material flow cost accounting and traditional cost accounting – in reply to the questions and misunderstandings on material flow cost accounting. Kansai Fre Rev Bus Commer 6:1–20

    Google Scholar 

  39. Oenning A (1997) Theorie betrieblicher Kuppelproduktion. Physica, Heidelberg

    Book  Google Scholar 

  40. Pfaff D (1995) Kostenrechnung, Verhaltenssteuerung und Controlling. Unternehmung 49:437–455

    Google Scholar 

  41. Prammer HK (2009) Integriertes Umweltkostenmanagement – Bezugsrahmen und Konzeption für eine ökologisch nachhaltige Unternehmensführung. Gabler Research, Wiesbaden

    Google Scholar 

  42. Rieckhof R, Bergmann A, Guenther E (2015) Interrelating material flow cost accounting with management control systems to introduce resource efficiency into strategy. J Clean Prod 108:1262–1278. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.10.040

    Article  Google Scholar 

  43. Schaltegger S, Zvezdov D (2015) Expanding material flow cost accounting – framework, review and potentials. J Clean Prod 108:1333–1341. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.08.040

    Article  Google Scholar 

  44. Schmalenbach E (1962) Dynamische Bilanz. Westdeutscher Verlag, Köln

    Google Scholar 

  45. Schmalenbach E (1963) Kostenrechnung und Preispolitik, 8th edn. Westdeutscher, Köln

    Google Scholar 

  46. Schmidt M, Nakajima M (2013) Material flow cost accounting as an approach to improve resource efficiency in manufacturing companies. Resources 2(3):358–369. doi:10.3390/resources2030358

    Article  Google Scholar 

  47. Schmidt M (2015) The interpretation and extension of Material Flow Cost Accounting (MFCA) in the context of environmental material flow analysis. J Clean Prod 108:1310–1319. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.11.038

    Article  Google Scholar 

  48. Schrack D (2014) Die Materialflusskostenrechnung in der Lieferkette – Mengen- und Kostenwirkungen auf vor- und nachgelagerte Stufen und Entwicklung eines Kennzahlensystems. In: Prammer HK (ed) Ressourceneffizientes Wirtschaften – Management der Materialflüsse als Herausforderung für Politik und Unternehmen. Springer Gabler, Wiesbaden, pp 55–90

    Google Scholar 

  49. Schrack D (2016) Nachhaltigkeitsorientierte Materialflusskostenrechnung. Anwendung in Lieferketten, der Abfallwirtschaft und Integration externer Effekte. Springer Gabler, Wiesbaden

    Google Scholar 

  50. Schweitzer M, Küpper HU (2011) Systeme der Kosten-und Erlösrechnung, 10th edn. Vahlen, München

    Google Scholar 

  51. Simons R (1995) Levers of control – how managers use innovative control systems to drive strategic renewal. Harvard Business Review Press, Boston

    Google Scholar 

  52. Strebel H (2003) Kritische Würdigung der Umweltkosten- und Stoffflussrechnungen. In: Kramer M, Eifler P (eds) Umwelt- und kostenorientierte Unternehmensführung – Zur Identifikation von Win-Win-Potenzialen. Deutscher Universitätsverlag, Wiesbaden, pp 155–166

    Google Scholar 

  53. Strebel H (2006) Nachhaltige Wirtschaft und betriebliches Rechnungswesen. In: Göllinger T (ed) Bausteine einer nachhaltigkeitsorientierten Betriebswirtschaftslehre – Festschrift für Eberhard Seidel. Metropolis, Marburg, pp 177–192

    Google Scholar 

  54. Sygulla R, Götze U, Bierer A (2014) Material flow cost accounting – a tool for designing economically and ecologically sustainable production processes. In: Henriques E, Pecas P, Silva A (eds) Technology and manufacturing process selection: the product life cycle perspective. Springer, London, pp 105–130

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Edeltraud Guenther.

Ethics declarations

Conflict of interest

E. Guenther, R. Rieckhof, M. Walz and D. Schrack declare that they have no competing interests.

Additional information

Permission/translation information

Originally published as Günther E, Rieckhof R, Schrack D, Walz M (2016) Materialflusskostenrechnung im Lichte eines klassischen Kostenrechnungsverständnisses: Versuch einer Annäherung pp. 149–174 In: Ahn H, Clermont M, Souren R (Eds.) Nachhaltiges Entscheiden, Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. The original German language book section was part of a commemorative volume on the occasion of the 65th birthday of Univ.-Prof. Dr. rer. pol. Harald Dyckhoff. With permission of Springer Nature. Many thanks to John Micozzi for providing the translation.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Guenther, E., Rieckhof, R., Walz, M. et al. Material flow cost accounting in the light of the traditional cost accounting. uwf 25, 5–14 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00550-017-0446-7

Download citation

Keywords

  • Cost flows
  • Interdisciplinary decision-support
  • Environmental management accounting
  • Material flow cost accounting
  • Product and non-product output

Schlüsselwörter

  • Kostenflüsse
  • Interdisziplinäre Entscheidungsunterstützung
  • Umweltkostenrechnung
  • Materialflusskostenrechnung
  • Produkt- und Nicht-Produkt-Output