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Journal of Anesthesia

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 395–400 | Cite as

Effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on pulmonary vagal afferents and phrenic nerve activity in cats

  • Mitsuru Aoki
  • Yuzo Harada
  • Akiyoshi Namiki
  • Makio Ikeda
  • Hitoshi Shimizu
Original Articles

Abstract

The ability of lidocaine to suppress activity of single vagal afferent fiber and that of phrenic nerve was studied in 20 cats anesthetized with pentobarbital. Slowly adapting stretch receptors (SAR, n=16) and rapidly adapting stretch receptors (RAR, n=7) were identified by their discharge pattern to pulmonary inflation. Intravenous lidocaine (1 mg·kg−1 or 2 mg·kg−1 ) produced a suppression of SAR activity but not of RAR activity. Suppression of phrenic nerve activity lasted much longer than that of SAR. These findings indicate that iv lidocaine acts more dominantly on CNS than on peripherals. We conclude that iv lidocaine prevents cough and hemodynamic changes caused by airway manipulation mainly through its action on CNS and not on peripherals (peripheral nerves or their receptor).

Key words

airway reflex local anesthetics lidocaine phrenic nerve vagus pulmonary afferent fiber 

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mitsuru Aoki
    • 1
  • Yuzo Harada
    • 1
  • Akiyoshi Namiki
    • 1
  • Makio Ikeda
    • 1
  • Hitoshi Shimizu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologySapporo Medical CollegeSapporoJapan

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