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Comparative effectiveness of interventions for managing postoperative catheter-related bladder discomfort: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

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A Letter to the Editor to this article was published on 09 March 2019

Abstract

Background

Although many drugs or interventions have been studied to manage catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD), their comparative effectiveness is unknown. We attempted to assess the comparative effectiveness of the strategies to manage CRBD in patients undergoing urologic surgery including amikacin, solifenacin, darifenacin, butylscopolamine, dexmedetomidine, gabapentin, glycopyrrolate, ketamine, oxybutynin, resiniferatoxin, tolterodine, tramadol, caudal block, dorsal penile nerve block, lidocaine–prilocaine cream.

Methods

We performed an arm-based network meta-analysis including 29 trials with 2841 participants. Goodness of model fit was evaluated by deviance information criteria (DIC). The incidence of CRBD at 0, 1, and 6 h after surgery and the incidence of moderate to severe CRBD at 0, 1, and 6 h after surgery were compared.

Results

Random effect model was selected according to DIC. Most of the drugs significantly decreased the incidence of CRBD except amikacin, tramadol at 0 and 1 h after surgery. Dexmedetomidine, solifenacin, caudal block, dorsal penile nerve block, resiniferatoxin, and gabapentin 1200 mg p.o. significantly decreased the incidence of CRBD at 6 h after surgery (gabapentin 1200: Odds ratio [OR] 0.02; SUCRA 95.6). Dexmedetomidine and tolterodine significantly decreased the incidence of moderate to severe CRBD at 0, 1, and 6 h after surgery (tolterodine at 6 h: OR 0.05; SUCRA 73.7).

Conclusions

Gabapentin was ranked best regarding the overall incidence of CRBD, while tolterodine was ranked best in reducing the severity of CRBD. However, a firm conclusion cannot be made from our analysis due to small-study number and heterogeneity regarding study setting and outcome measurement.

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Acknowledgements

This study was supported by SNUH Research Fund (no. 2320170030). Study sponsors had no role in study design; data collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; writing the paper; and the decision to submit the report for publication.

Funding

This study was supported by SNUH Research Fund (no. 2320170030).

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Correspondence to Won Ho Kim.

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Hur, M., Park, SK., Yoon, HK. et al. Comparative effectiveness of interventions for managing postoperative catheter-related bladder discomfort: a systematic review and network meta-analysis. J Anesth 33, 197–208 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00540-018-2597-2

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