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Journal of Gastroenterology

, Volume 38, Issue 1, pp 74–78 | Cite as

A case of primary esophageal tuberculosis diagnosed by identification of Mycobacteria in paraffin-embedded esophageal biopsy specimens by polymerase chain reaction

  • Toshifumi Fujiwara
  • Yukio Yoshida
  • Shigeki Yamada
  • Hitoshi Kawamata
  • Takahiro Fujimori
  • Michio Imawari
Case report

We present a case of primary esophageal tuberculosis diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of paraffin-embedded esophageal biopsy specimens. A 42-year-old Japanese woman visited our clinic because of dysphagia. Radiologic and endoscopic examinations revealed a stenotic lesion with reddish mucosa and multiple ulcers in the middle esophagus. There was no associated lesion outside the esophagus. Histological and bacteriological studies of esophageal biopsy specimens and gastric aspirates did not give a definitive diagnosis. However, mycobacterial DNA was detected by PCR of paraffin-embedded esophageal biopsy specimens. She then was diagnosed as having primary esophageal tuberculosis. The esophageal mucosal lesion almost healed after 1 month of antituberculosis medication with residual annular stenosis which was resolved later by endoscopic balloon dilation.

Key words: primary esophageal tuberculosis polymerase chain reaction endoscopic balloon dilation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshifumi Fujiwara
    • 1
  • Yukio Yoshida
    • 1
  • Shigeki Yamada
    • 2
  • Hitoshi Kawamata
    • 3
  • Takahiro Fujimori
    • 3
  • Michio Imawari
    • 1
  1. 1. Division of Gastroenterology, Omiya Medical Center, Jichi Medical School, 1-847 Amanumacho, Saitama 330-8503, JapanJP
  2. 2. Division of Pathology, Omiya Medical Center, Jichi Medical School, Saitama, JapanJP
  3. 3. Department of Surgical and Molecular Pathology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Tochigi, JapanJP

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