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International Journal of Earth Sciences

, Volume 101, Issue 1, pp 389–392 | Cite as

Reply to Preusser et al. on Frechen et al. “Late Pleistocene fluvial dynamics in the Hochrhein Valley in the upper Rhine Graben: chronological frame”

  • Manfred FrechenEmail author
  • Dietrich Ellwanger
  • Matthias Hinderer
  • Jörg Lämmermann-Barthel
  • Inge Neeb
  • Astrid Techmer
Reply

The River Rhine provides one of the most detailed late Cenozoic terrestrial records of fluvial activity in Europe triggered by climatic and tectonic activities (Boenigk and Frechen 2006). Frechen et al. (2008, 2010) provided OSL-based chronologies for the late Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial dynamics in the Hochrhein Valley and in the Upper Rhine Graben (URG). The OSL age estimates are in excellent agreement with the stratigraphical concept of sedimentary dynamics in the southern URG (see Frechen et al. 2008, 2010; Lämmermann-Barthel et al. 2009). All samples taken from below an event layer (discontinuity) yielded OSL age estimates older than 20 ka and those from above the event layer gave estimates younger than 20 ka. The results are all in stratigraphic order and for the Holocene fluvial sediments in agreement with three radiocarbon ages. The validity of this approach was checked against known age samples from Bremgarten. A comparison between radiocarbon ages of wood and four OSL...

Keywords

Late Pleistocene Small Aliquot Fluvial Sediment Fluvial Deposit Fluvial Dynamic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manfred Frechen
    • 1
    Email author
  • Dietrich Ellwanger
    • 2
  • Matthias Hinderer
    • 3
  • Jörg Lämmermann-Barthel
    • 3
  • Inge Neeb
    • 2
    • 3
  • Astrid Techmer
    • 1
  1. 1.Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG)HannoverGermany
  2. 2.Regierungspräsidium Freiberg, Landesamt für Geologie, Rohstoffe und Bergbau Baden-WürttembergFreiburgGermany
  3. 3.Institut für Angewandte GeowissenschaftenTechnische Universität DarmstadtDarmstadtGermany

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