Supportive Care in Cancer

, Volume 25, Issue 4, pp 1047–1054 | Cite as

Sustainable impact of an individualized exercise program on physical activity level and fatigue syndrome on breast cancer patients in two German rehabilitation centers

  • Freerk T. Baumann
  • Oliver Bieck
  • Max Oberste
  • Rafaela Kuhn
  • Joachim Schmitt
  • Steffen Wentrock
  • Eva Zopf
  • Wilhelm Bloch
  • Klaus Schüle
  • Monika Reuss-Borst
Original Article

Abstract

Purpose

Although physical activity has been demonstrated to increase cancer survival in epidemiological studies, breast cancer patients tend toward inactivity after treatment.

Methods

Breast cancer patients were quasi-randomly allocated to two different groups, intervention (IG) and control (CG) groups. The intervention group (n = 111) received an individual 3-week exercise program with two additional 1-week inpatient stays after 4 and 8 months. At the end of the rehabilitation, a home-based exercise program was designed. The control group (n = 83) received a 3-week rehabilitation program and did not obtain any follow-up care. Patients from both groups were measured using questionnaires on physical activity, fatigue, and quality of life (QoL) at five time points, 4 months (t1), 8 months (t2), 12 months (t3), 18 months (t4), and 24 months (t5) after the beginning of the rehabilitation.

Results

After 2 years, the level of physical activity (total metabolic rate) increased significantly from 2733.16 ± 2547.95 (t0) to 4169.71 ± 3492.27 (t5) metabolic equivalent (MET)-min/week in the intervention group, but just slightly changed from 2858.38 ± 2393.79 (t0) to 2875.74 ± 2590.15 (t5) MET-min/week in the control group (means ± standard deviation). Furthermore, the internal group comparison showed significant differences after 2 years as well. These results came along with a significantly reduced fatigue syndrome and an increased health-related quality of life.

Conclusions

The data indicate that an individual, according to their preferences, and physical-resource-adapted exercise program has a more sustainable impact on the physical activity level in breast cancer patients than the usual care. It is suggested that the rehabilitation program should be personalized for all breast cancer patients.

Keywords

Exercise Cancer Rehabilitation Sustain Physical activity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Freerk T. Baumann
    • 1
  • Oliver Bieck
    • 2
  • Max Oberste
    • 2
  • Rafaela Kuhn
    • 3
  • Joachim Schmitt
    • 3
  • Steffen Wentrock
    • 3
  • Eva Zopf
    • 2
    • 4
  • Wilhelm Bloch
    • 2
  • Klaus Schüle
    • 2
  • Monika Reuss-Borst
    • 5
  1. 1.Department 1 of Internal MedicineCenter for Integrated Oncology Köln Bonn University Clinic of CologneCologneGermany
  2. 2.Department of Molecular and Cellular Sport Medicine, Institute of Cardiovascular Research and Sport MedicineGerman Sport University CologneCologneGermany
  3. 3.Rehabilitation Center“Klinik Am Kurpark”Bad KissingenGermany
  4. 4.Institute for Health and AgeingAustralian Catholic UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  5. 5.Facharztpraxis am Rehabilitations- und PräventionszentrumBad BockletGermany

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