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Risk factors for bone pain among patients with cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors for bone pain in patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim.

Methods

Individual patient data from 22 pegfilgrastim clinical trials were analyzed. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate risk factors associated with grade ≥2 bone pain and any grade bone pain in the first chemotherapy cycle and across cycles 1–6.

Results

Of the 1949 patients analyzed, 19 and 36 % had grade ≥2 and any grade bone pain, respectively, in cycle 1, and 28 and 51 % had grade ≥2 and any grade bone pain, respectively, across cycles 1–6. In cycle 1, history of bone pain (odds ratio (OR), 1.51; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.09–2.07) was associated with increased risk of grade ≥2 bone pain; age ≥65 years (versus <45 years; OR, 0.64; 95 % CI, 0.42–0.98), the European Union region (versus the USA region; OR, 0.32; 95 % CI, 0.20–0.52), colorectal cancer (versus breast cancer; OR, 0.14; 95 % CI, 0.05–0.41), and small-cell lung cancer (OR, 0.34; 95 % CI, 0.12–0.98) were associated with reduced risk of grade ≥2 bone pain.

Conclusions

Potential risk factors for bone pain in patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy and primary prophylactic pegfilgrastim identified in this study are younger age and history of bone pain. No other association with clinical factors and risk of bone pain was detected. Better understanding of risk factors for bone pain would be useful in identifying patients who may benefit from pain prevention strategies.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Esteban Abella, MD, formerly of Amgen Inc. for his contribution to the study. Jenilyn Virrey, PhD, of Amgen Inc. provided medical writing assistance.

Funding

This work was supported by Amgen Inc.

Disclosure

Hairong Xu, Qi Gong, Florian D. Vogl, Maureen Reiner, and John H. Page are employees of and own stock in Amgen Inc.

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Correspondence to H. Xu.

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Xu, H., Gong, Q., Vogl, F.D. et al. Risk factors for bone pain among patients with cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim. Support Care Cancer 24, 723–730 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-015-2834-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-015-2834-2

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