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Trees

, Volume 29, Issue 5, pp 1533–1543 | Cite as

Analysis of static bending-induced compression wood formation in juvenile Picea omorika (Pančić) Purkynĕ

  • Aleksandra Mitrović
  • Lloyd A. Donaldson
  • Daniela Djikanović
  • Jelena Bogdanović Pristov
  • Jasna Simonović
  • Dragosav Mutavdžić
  • Aleksandar Kalauzi
  • Vuk Maksimović
  • Bernadette Nanayakkara
  • Ksenija Radotić
Original Paper
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Biomechanics

Abstract

Key message

Young P. omorika trees subjected to static bending showed a severe compression wood response as characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy/microscopy, which decreased in severity with height correlated with a decrease in bending moment.

Abstract

This investigation is aimed at understanding the reaction wood response in a slow-growing conifer species under conditions of severe and long-term bending stress. Compression wood (CW) formation was studied in stems of juvenile P. omorika after trees were subjected to static bending by wiring at an angle of about 90 degrees, for 1 year. The applied static bending would correspond to the impact of winter snow loads or snow falls on juvenile conifers. Stem sections were collected during one growing season and examined by fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy including deconvolution analysis. Trees exposed to bending produced large amounts of severe CW but very low amounts of opposite wood (OW) during the experimental season indicating a dramatic change in biomass distribution compared to control trees. Indicators of cell wall structure changes, such as fluorescence emission spectra, peak intensities, and shifts in the positions of the long-wavelength spectral components, decreased from the stem base to the top of the stem, in line with a calculated decrease in bending moment.

Keywords

Compression wood Fluorescence spectroscopy Galactan Lignin Opposite wood Picea omorika (Pančić) Purkynĕ 

Abbreviations

APD

Approximation of the probability density

CW

Compression wood

FAA

Formalin aceto-alcohol

OW

Opposite wood

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was financed by the grants ON173017 and ON173040 from the Ministry of the Education and Science of the Republic of Serbia, the grant from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, New Zealand and a sabbatical for Dr Ksenija Radotić from Scion, New Zealand in March–April 2012.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aleksandra Mitrović
    • 1
  • Lloyd A. Donaldson
    • 2
  • Daniela Djikanović
    • 1
  • Jelena Bogdanović Pristov
    • 1
  • Jasna Simonović
    • 1
  • Dragosav Mutavdžić
    • 1
  • Aleksandar Kalauzi
    • 1
  • Vuk Maksimović
    • 1
  • Bernadette Nanayakkara
    • 2
  • Ksenija Radotić
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Multidisciplinary ResearchUniversity of BelgradeBelgradeSerbia
  2. 2.ScionRotoruaNew Zealand

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