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Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 46–48 | Cite as

Effect of extreme prematurity on renal dopamine and norepinephrine excretion during the neonatal period

  • Mireille Vanpée
  • Peter Herin
  • Hugo Lagercrantz
  • Anita Aperia
Original article

Abstract.

Dopamine (DA), produced in proximal tubular cells, is believed to be an important intrarenal natriuretic hormone. Experimental studies have shown that the natriuretic effect of DA is less pronounced in the fetal kidney. We have evaluated renal DA and norepinephrine (NE) in the neonatal period, using urinary excretion as an indicator of renally produced/released catecholamines. In very low-birth-weight infants (25 – 30 weeks gestational age) there was an increase in urinary DA (pmol/μmol urinary creatinine) and NE (pmol/μmol urinary creatinine) from 1 to 13 days postnatal age, despite a decrease in sodium excretion. Urinary NE correlated with plasma NE, whereas plasma DA was undetectable. In summary, NE excretion parallels plasma levels and could reflect the general sympathoadrenal activity, whereas DA is primarily of renal origin. Renal DA and NE increase in the first 2 weeks of life in immature infants. We conclude that the catecholamine system of the human kidney undergoes maturational changes postnatally.

Key words: Dopamine Natriuresis Neonatal period Norepinephrine Preterm 

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Copyright information

© IPNA - International Pediatric Nephrology Association New York, USA 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mireille Vanpée
    • 1
  • Peter Herin
    • 2
  • Hugo Lagercrantz
    • 1
  • Anita Aperia
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Woman and Child Health, Pediatric Unit, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, SwedenSE
  2. 2.Pediatric Department at Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, SwedenSE

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