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Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 2–6 | Cite as

Persistent hypercalciuria and elevated 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in children with infantile hypercalcaemia

  • Ewa Pronicka
  • Elżbieta Rowińska
  • Hanna Kulczycka
  • Jacek Łukaszkiewicz
  • Roman Lorenc
  • Roman Janas
Original article

Abstract.

The aim of the study was to characterize abnormalities of calcium-phosphate and vitamin D3 metabolism in children with a past history of “mild” Lightwood-type idiopathic infantile hypercalcaemia. Seventeen seemingly healthy children aged 2 – 12 years, with long-term idiopathic hypercalcaemic syndrome since infancy were studied. Two reference groups were also included (vitamin D3 intoxication/healthy and Williams groups). Despite a long-term milk-restricted diet and a restricted vitamin D3 intake, urinary calcium excretion in the study group was 0.117±0.07 mmol/kg per 24 h. Compared with the reference groups (0.047±0.029 and 0.067±0.06 mmol/kg per 24 h, P<0.05), there was significant hypercalciuria in the children with idiopathic hypercalcaemia since infancy. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in the study group were also elevated compared with the reference groups (57.4±15.5 vs. 34.6±9.3 and 22.7±10.5 ng/ml). 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels were at the upper limit of normal (45.9±13.1 vs. 35.0±8.1 and 30.0±13.7 pg/ml). Non-progressive, clinically silent nephrocalcinosis was visible on ultrasound examinations. The disturbances of vitamin D3 and calcium-phosphate metabolism persistent in the normocalcaemic phase of idiopathic infantile hypercalcaemia may be a primary metabolic defect of the condition. The mechanisms leading to elevation of metabolites of 1,25-dihydroxy- and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and the relationship between this and persistent hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis need pathophysiological explanation.

Key words: Idiopathic infantile hypercalcaemia     Idiopathic hypercalciuria     1 25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3    Nephrocalcinosis 

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Copyright information

© IPNA - International Pediatric Nephrology Association New York, USA 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ewa Pronicka
    • 1
  • Elżbieta Rowińska
    • 1
  • Hanna Kulczycka
    • 1
  • Jacek Łukaszkiewicz
    • 2
  • Roman Lorenc
    • 2
  • Roman Janas
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Metabolic Diseases, The Children’s Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, PolandPL
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry and Experimental Medicine, The Children’s Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, PolandPL
  3. 3.Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Children’s Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, PolandPL

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