Dysphagia

, Volume 29, Issue 3, pp 365–375

Functional Outcomes and Quality of Life After Chemoradiotherapy: Baseline and 3 and 6 Months Post-Treatment

  • C. L. Lazarus
  • H. Husaini
  • K. Hu
  • B. Culliney
  • Z. Li
  • M. Urken
  • A. Jacobson
  • M. Persky
  • T. Tran
  • C. Concert
  • D. Palacios
  • R. Metcalfe-Klaw
  • M. Kumar
  • B. Bennett
  • L. Harrison
Original Article

Abstract

Concomitant chemoradiotherapy provides organ preservation for those patients with head and neck cancer. We report the results of a prospective study that examined functional outcomes and quality of life (QOL) after chemoradiotherapy over the first 6 months post-treatment (tx). Twenty-nine patients with head and neck cancer were treated with chemoradiotherapy. All were seen baseline and 3 and 6 months post-tx. Assessments included the performance status scale (PSS), Karnofsky performance status scale, tongue strength, jaw opening, and saliva weight. QOL was patient-rated using the eating assessment tool (EAT-10), MD Anderson dysphagia inventory, speech handicap index (SHI), and the EORTC H&N35 scale. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were used, with significance at p < 0.05. PSS scores were significantly different across time points. Tongue strength, jaw range of motion (ROM), and saliva weight were significantly lower at 3 and 6 months than at baseline. QOL was significantly worse after tx, although it improved by 6 months as rated with the EAT-10 and the SHI scores were significantly worse at 3 and 6 months. EORTC domains of swallowing, senses, speech, dry mouth, and sticky saliva were significantly worse at 3 and 6 months. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy for treatment of head and neck tumors can result in impaired performance outcomes and QOL over the first 6 months post-tx. However, performance status, tongue strength, jaw ROM, and eating QOL were only mildly impaired by 6 months post-tx. Saliva production and speech QOL remained significantly impaired at 6 months post-treatment. Current studies are examining outcomes at 12 and 24 months post-treatment to better predict outcomes over time in this population.

Keywords

Tongue strength Deglutition Deglutition disorders Chemoradiotherapy Oral cancer Outcomes QOL 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. L. Lazarus
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • H. Husaini
    • 1
  • K. Hu
    • 4
    • 7
  • B. Culliney
    • 5
    • 8
  • Z. Li
    • 5
    • 8
  • M. Urken
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. Jacobson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • M. Persky
    • 2
    • 3
  • T. Tran
    • 2
    • 3
  • C. Concert
    • 4
  • D. Palacios
    • 5
  • R. Metcalfe-Klaw
    • 6
  • M. Kumar
    • 6
  • B. Bennett
    • 6
  • L. Harrison
    • 4
    • 7
  1. 1.Thyroid Head and Neck Cancer FoundationMount Sinai Beth IsraelNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck SurgeryMount Sinai Beth IsraelNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of OtolaryngologyIcahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Department of Radiation OncologyMount Sinai Beth IsraelNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Department of Medical OncologyMount Sinai Beth IsraelNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.Cancer CenterMount Sinai Beth IsraelNew YorkUSA
  7. 7.Department of Radiation OncologyIcahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA
  8. 8.Department of Medical OncologyIcahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA

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