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Measuring Oral Sensitivity in Clinical Practice: A Quick and Reliable Behavioural Method

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Abstract

This article aims to offer a behavioural assessment strategy for oral sensitivity that can be readily applied in the clinical setting. Four children, ranging in age and with a variety of developmental and medical problems, were used as test cases for a task analysis of tolerance to touch probes in and around the mouth. In all cases, the assessment was sensitive to weekly measures of an intervention for oral sensitivity over a 3-week period. Employing an inexpensive, direct, specific to the individual, replicable, reliable, and effective measure for a specific sensory problem would fit better with the edicts of evidence-based practice. The current method offered the initial evidence towards this goal.

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Correspondence to Terence M. Dovey.

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Dovey, T.M., Aldridge, V.K. & Martin, C.I. Measuring Oral Sensitivity in Clinical Practice: A Quick and Reliable Behavioural Method. Dysphagia 28, 501–510 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-013-9460-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-013-9460-2

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