Algorithmica

, Volume 77, Issue 1, pp 84–115 | Cite as

Campaign Management Under Approval-Driven Voting Rules

  • Ildiko Schlotter
  • Piotr Faliszewski
  • Edith Elkind
Article

Abstract

Approval-like voting rules, such as sincere-strategy preference-based approval voting (SP-AV), the Bucklin rule (an adaptive variant of k-approval voting), and the Fallback rule (a hybrid of the Bucklin rule and SP-AV) have many desirable properties: for example, they are easy to understand and encourage the candidates to choose electoral platforms that have a broad appeal. In this paper, we investigate both classic and parameterized computational complexity of electoral campaign management under such rules. We focus on two methods that can be used to promote a given candidate: asking voters to move this candidate upwards in their preference order or asking them to change the number of candidates they approve of. We show that finding an optimal campaign management strategy of the first type is easy for both Bucklin and Fallback. In contrast, the second method is computationally hard even if the degree to which we need to affect the votes is small. Nevertheless, we identify a large class of scenarios that admit fixed-parameter tractable algorithms.

Keywords

Approval voting Bucklin voting Fallback voting  Campaign management Bribery Parameterized complexity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ildiko Schlotter
    • 1
  • Piotr Faliszewski
    • 2
  • Edith Elkind
    • 3
  1. 1.Budapest University of Technology and EconomicsBudapestHungary
  2. 2.AGH UniversityKrakówPoland
  3. 3.University of OxfordOxfordUK

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