The vision for MUSE4Music

Applying the MUSE method in musicology
  • Johanna Barzen
  • Uwe Breitenbücher
  • Linus Eusterbrock
  • Michael Falkenthal
  • Frank Hentschel
  • Frank Leymann
Special Issue Paper

Abstract

Investigating the emotional impact of historical music, e.g. music of the 19th century, is a complex challenge since the subjects that listened to this music and their emotions are forever gone. As a result, asking them for their experiences is not possible anymore and we need other means to gain insights into the expressive quality of music of this century. In this vision paper, we describe a pattern-based method called MUSE4Music to quantitatively find similarities in different pieces of music. The reconstruction of musical patterns will allow us to draw conclusions from erratic documents that go far beyond the single pieces they are referring to.

Keywords

Pattern discovery Musical patterns Automation Mining Digital humanities Musical expressivity 

References

  1. 1.
    Alexander C, Ishikawa S, Silverstein M (1977) A pattern language: towns, buildings, construction. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Barzen J, Leymann F (2014) Costume languages as pattern languages. In: Proceedings of Pursuit of pattern languages for societal change (PURPLSOC)—preparatory workshop, epubli GmbH, pp 88–117Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Barzen J, Leymann F (2016) Patterns as formulas: applying the scientific method to the humanities. Tech. Rep. 2016/01, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart. http://www.iaas.uni-stuttgart.de/RUS-data/TR-2016-01%20-%20Patterns%20as%20Formulas.pdf
  4. 4.
    Falkenthal M, Barzen J, Breitenbücher U, Fehling C, Leymann F (2014) Efficient pattern application: validating the concept of solution implementations in different domains. Int J Adv Softw 7(3 and 4):710–726Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Falkenthal M, Barzen J, Breitenbücher U, Fehling C, Leymann F (2014) From pattern languages to solution implementations. In: Proceedings of the 6th international conferences on pervasive patterns and applications (PATTERNS), pp 12–21Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Fehling C, Barzen J, Falkenthal M, Leymann F (2014) PatternPedia—collaborative pattern identification and authoring. In: Proceedings of pursuit of pattern languages for societal change (PURPLSOC)—preparatory workshop, epubli GmbH, pp 252–284Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Hentschel F (2013) Festlichkeit: expressive Qualität und historische Semantik bei Beethoven. Archiv für Musikwissenschaft 70:161–190Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    McKay N (2007) On topics today. Zeitschrift der Gesellschaft für Musiktheorie 4(1):159–183Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Mirka D (2014) The oxford handbook of topic theory. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ratner L (1980) Classic music: expression, form, and style. Schirmer, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Schumm D, Barzen J, Leymann F, Ellrich L (2012) A pattern language for costumes in films. In: Proceedings of the 17th European conference on pattern languages of programs (EuroPLoP). ACM, pp 221–249Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Zentner M, Grandjean D, Scherer KR (2008) Emotions evoked by the sound of music: characterization, classification, and measurement. Emotion 8(4):494–521CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johanna Barzen
    • 1
  • Uwe Breitenbücher
    • 1
  • Linus Eusterbrock
    • 2
  • Michael Falkenthal
    • 1
  • Frank Hentschel
    • 2
  • Frank Leymann
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Architecture of Application SystemsUniversity of StuttgartStuttgartGermany
  2. 2.Musicological InstituteUniversity of CologneCologneGermany

Personalised recommendations