Plants learn and remember: lets get used to it

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Authors

Contributions

MG, CIA, and MD conceived, designed, and executed this study and MG wrote the manuscript. No other person is entitled to authorship.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Monica Gagliano.

Additional information

Communicated by Richard Karban.

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Gagliano, M., Abramson, C.I. & Depczynski, M. Plants learn and remember: lets get used to it. Oecologia 186, 29–31 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-017-4029-7

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Keywords

  • Plant Learning
  • Relevant Behavioral Characteristics
  • Closest Leaf
  • Vertical Drop
  • Habitua