Oecologia

, Volume 182, Issue 2, pp 595–609

Pollen limitation may be a common Allee effect in marine hydrophilous plants: implications for decline and recovery in seagrasses

  • B. I. Van Tussenbroek
  • L. M. Soissons
  • T. J. Bouma
  • R. Asmus
  • I. Auby
  • F. G. Brun
  • P. G. Cardoso
  • N. Desroy
  • J. Fournier
  • F. Ganthy
  • J. M. Garmendia
  • L. Godet
  • T. F. Grilo
  • P. Kadel
  • B. Ondiviela
  • G. Peralta
  • M. Recio
  • M. Valle
  • T. Van der Heide
  • M. M. Van Katwijk
Conservation ecology – original research

DOI: 10.1007/s00442-016-3665-7

Cite this article as:
Van Tussenbroek, B.I., Soissons, L.M., Bouma, T.J. et al. Oecologia (2016) 182: 595. doi:10.1007/s00442-016-3665-7

Abstract

Pollen limitation may be an important factor in accelerated decline of sparse or fragmented populations. Little is known whether hydrophilous plants (pollen transport by water) suffer from an Allee effect due to pollen limitation or not. Hydrophilous pollination is a typical trait of marine angiosperms or seagrasses. Although seagrass flowers usually have high pollen production, floral densities are highly variable. We evaluated pollen limitation for intertidal populations of the seagrass Zostera noltei in The Netherlands and found a significant positive relation between flowering spathe density and fruit-set, which was suboptimal at <1200 flowering spathes m−2 (corresponding to <600 reproductive shoots m−2). A fragmented population had ≈35 % lower fruit-set at similar reproductive density than a continuous population. 75 % of all European populations studied over a large latitudinal gradient had flowering spathe densities below that required for optimal fruit-set, particularly in Southern countries. Literature review of the reproductive output of hydrophilous pollinated plants revealed that seed- or fruit-set of marine hydrophilous plants is generally low, as compared to hydrophilous freshwater and wind-pollinated plants. We conclude that pollen limitation as found in Z. noltei may be a common Allee effect for seagrasses, potentially accelerating decline and impairing recovery even after environmental conditions have improved substantially.

Keywords

Abiotic pollination Density dependence Habitat fragmentation Seed production Zostera noltei 

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
Dirección General del Personal Académico of Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
    Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek
    • 843.10.003

    Copyright information

    © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

    Authors and Affiliations

    • B. I. Van Tussenbroek
      • 1
      • 2
    • L. M. Soissons
      • 3
    • T. J. Bouma
      • 3
    • R. Asmus
      • 4
    • I. Auby
      • 5
    • F. G. Brun
      • 6
    • P. G. Cardoso
      • 7
    • N. Desroy
      • 8
    • J. Fournier
      • 9
    • F. Ganthy
      • 5
    • J. M. Garmendia
      • 10
    • L. Godet
      • 11
    • T. F. Grilo
      • 12
    • P. Kadel
      • 4
    • B. Ondiviela
      • 13
    • G. Peralta
      • 6
    • M. Recio
      • 13
    • M. Valle
      • 10
      • 14
    • T. Van der Heide
      • 15
    • M. M. Van Katwijk
      • 1
    1. 1.Department of Environmental Science, Institute for Wetland and Water ResearchRadboud UniversityNijmegenThe Netherlands
    2. 2.Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y LimnologíaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de MéxicoCancúnMexico
    3. 3.Department of Estuarine and Delta Systems (EDS), NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea ResearchUtrecht UniversityYersekeThe Netherlands
    4. 4.Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar-und Meeresforschung, Wadden Sea Station SyltListGermany
    5. 5.IFREMER-LER/ARArcachonFrance
    6. 6.Departamento de Biología, Área de Ecología, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y AmbientalesUniversidad de CádizCádizSpain
    7. 7.Department of Life Sciences, IMAR—Institute of Marine ResearchUniversity of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal
    8. 8.IFREMER-LER DinardDinardFrance
    9. 9.UMR 7208 BOREA, Station de Biologie Marine MNHNCNRSConcarneau CedexFrance
    10. 10.Marine Research DivisionAZTI-TecnaliaPasaiaSpain
    11. 11.CNRS, UMR 6554 LETG-Nantes GéolittomerUniversité de NantesNantes Cedex 3France
    12. 12.Department of Life Sciences, CFE—Centre for Functional EcologyUniversity of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal
    13. 13.Environmental Hydraulics Institute “IH Cantabria”, Parque Científico y Tecnológico de CantabriaUniversidad de CantabriaSantanderSpain
    14. 14.Central Research Department, Universidad Laica Eloy Alfaro de ManabíCiudadela UniversitariaMantaEcuador
    15. 15.Department of Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Institute for Wetland and Water ResearchRadboud University NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands

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