Oecologia

, Volume 178, Issue 1, pp 239–248

Trophic dynamics in an aquatic community: interactions among primary producers, grazers, and a pathogenic fungus

  • Julia C. Buck
  • Katharina I. Scholz
  • Jason R. Rohr
  • Andrew R. Blaustein
Community ecology - Original research

DOI: 10.1007/s00442-014-3165-6

Cite this article as:
Buck, J.C., Scholz, K.I., Rohr, J.R. et al. Oecologia (2015) 178: 239. doi:10.1007/s00442-014-3165-6

Abstract

Free-living stages of parasites are consumed by a variety of predators, which might have important consequences for predators, parasites, and hosts. For example, zooplankton prey on the infectious stage of the amphibian chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a pathogen responsible for amphibian population declines and extinctions worldwide. Predation on parasites is predicted to influence community structure and function, and affect disease risk, but relatively few studies have explored its consequences empirically. We investigated interactions among Rana cascadae tadpoles, zooplankton, and Bd in a fully factorial experiment in outdoor mesocosms. We measured growth, development, survival, and infection of amphibians and took weekly measurements of the abundance of zooplankton, phytoplankton (suspended algae), and periphyton (attached algae). We hypothesized that zooplankton might have positive indirect effects on tadpoles by consuming Bd zoospores and by consuming phytoplankton, thus reducing the shading of a major tadpole resource, periphyton. We also hypothesized that zooplankton would have negative effects on tadpoles, mediated by competition for algal resources. Mixed-effects models, repeated-measures ANOVAs, and a structural equation model revealed that zooplankton significantly reduced phytoplankton but had no detectable effects on Bd or periphyton. Hence, the indirect positive effects of zooplankton on tadpoles were negligible when compared to the indirect negative effect mediated by competition for phytoplankton. We conclude that examination of host-pathogen dynamics within a community context may be necessary to elucidate complex community dynamics.

Keywords

Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Food web Pathogen Structural equation modeling Trophic cascade 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia C. Buck
    • 1
    • 4
  • Katharina I. Scholz
    • 2
  • Jason R. Rohr
    • 3
  • Andrew R. Blaustein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Integrative BiologyOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  2. 2.Agricultural SciencesUniversity of HohenheimStuttgartGermany
  3. 3.Department of Integrative BiologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  4. 4.Texas Research Institute for Environmental StudiesSam Houston State UniversityHuntsvilleUSA

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