Discovering DNA: Friedrich Miescher and the early years of nucleic acid research

Abstract

In the winter of 1868/9 the young Swiss doctor Friedrich Miescher, working in the laboratory of Felix Hoppe-Seyler at the University of Tübingen, performed experiments on the chemical composition of leukocytes that lead to the discovery of DNA. In his experiments, Miescher noticed a precipitate of an unknown substance, which he characterised further. Its properties during the isolation procedure and its resistance to protease digestion indicated that the novel substance was not a protein or lipid. Analyses of its elementary composition revealed that, unlike proteins, it contained large amounts of phosphorous and, as Miescher confirmed later, lacked sulphur. Miescher recognised that he had discovered a novel molecule. Since he had isolated it from the cells’ nuclei he named it nuclein, a name preserved in today’s designation deoxyribonucleic acid. In subsequent work Miescher showed that nuclein was a characteristic component of all nuclei and hypothesised that it would prove to be inextricably linked to the function of this organelle. He suggested that its abundance in tissues might be related to their physiological status with increases in “nuclear substances” preceding cell division. Miescher even speculated that it might have a role in the transmission of hereditary traits, but subsequently rejected the idea. This article reviews the events and circumstances leading to Miescher’s discovery of DNA and places them within their historic context. It also tries to elucidate why it was Miescher who discovered DNA and why his name is not universally associated with this molecule today.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4

Notes

  1. 1.

    Copies of Miescher's original handwritten letters are available from the Handschriftenabteilung of the University of Basel (see http://www.ub.unibas.ch or contact sekretariat-ub@unibas.ch). For Miescher’s letter of the 26 February 1869 to Wilhelm His, as well as three other letters written by Miescher during his time in Tübingen, see supplementary figure 1 of Electronic Supplementary Material.

References

  1. Altmann R (1889) Ueber Nucleinsäuren. Arch. f. Anatomie u. Physiol:524–536

  2. Anon (1970) Felix Hoppe-Seyler (1825–1895), Physiological Chemist. J Am Med Assoc 211:493–494

    Article  Google Scholar 

  3. Avery OT, MacLeod CM, McCarty M (1944) Studies of the chemical nature of the substance inducing transformation of pneumococcal types. Induction of transformation by a desoxyribonucleic acid fraction isolated from Pneumococcus Type III. J Exp Med 79:137–158

    Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  4. Baker JR (1957) The cell-theory: a restatement, history, and critique. Q J Microsc Sci 93:157–190

    Google Scholar 

  5. Chargaff E (1951) Structure and function of nucleic acid as cell constituent. Fed Proc 10:654–659

    PubMed  CAS  Google Scholar 

  6. Chargaff E, Vischer E, Doniger R, Green C, Misani F (1949) The composition of the desoxypentose nucleic acid of thymus and spleen. J Biol Chem 177:405–416

    PubMed  CAS  Google Scholar 

  7. Dahm R (2004) The molecule from the castle kitchen. Max Planck Res 2004:50–55

    Google Scholar 

  8. Dahm R (2005) Friedrich Miescher and the discovery of DNA. Dev Biol 278:274–288

    PubMed  Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  9. Davies K (2002) Cracking the genome: inside the race to unlock human DNA. John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore

    Google Scholar 

  10. Finger S (1994) Theories of brain function—the era of cortical localization. Origins of neuroscience, 1st edn. Oxford University Press, New York, pp 32–50

    Google Scholar 

  11. Fruton JS (1992) Bio-bibliography for the history of the biochemical sciences since 1800, 2nd edn. American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia

    Google Scholar 

  12. Fruton JS (1999) Proteins, enzymes, genes. Yale University Press, New Haven

    Google Scholar 

  13. Gehring WJ (1998) Master control genes in development and evolution: the homeobox story. Yale University Press, New Haven, pp 1–5

    Google Scholar 

  14. Haeckel E (1866) Generelle Morphologie der Organismen. Reimer, Berlin

    Google Scholar 

  15. Harris H (1999) The birth of the cell. Yale University Press, New Haven, USA

    Google Scholar 

  16. Hershey AD, Chase M (1952) Independent functions of viral proteins and nucleic acid in growth of bacteriophage. J Gen Physiol 36:39–56

    PubMed  Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  17. His W (1897a) Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 33–138

  18. His W (1897b) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig

  19. His W (1897c) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher, vol 2. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig

  20. His W (1897d) Einleitung. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 1–4

  21. His W (1897e) F. Miescher.In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 5–32

  22. Hoppe-Seyler F (1865) Handbuch der physiologisch- und pathologisch-chemischen Analyse für Aerzte und Studierende, 2nd edn. August Hirschwald, Berlin

    Google Scholar 

  23. Hoppe-Seyler F (1871) Ueber die chemische Zusammensetzung des Eiters. Medicinisch-chemische Untersuchungen 4:486–501

    Google Scholar 

  24. Kiernan JA (2001) Histological and histochemical methods—theory and practice. Arnold, London

    Google Scholar 

  25. Klose A (2007) Viktor von Bruns und die sterile Verbandswatte. Ausstellungskatalog des Stadtmuseums, Tübinger Kataloge 77:36–47

    Google Scholar 

  26. Kossel A (1891) Ueber die chemische Zusammensetzung der Zelle. Du Bois-Reymond’s Archiv/Arch Anat Physiol Physiol Abt:181–186

  27. Kossel A (1910) The chemical composition of the cell nucleus; nobel lecture, 12th December 1910. Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1901–1921

  28. Kossel A (1913) Beziehungen der Chemie zur Physiologie. In: Meyer Ev (ed) Die Kultur der Gegenwart, ihre Entwicklung und ihre Ziele: Chemie. Teubner, Leipzig, pp 376–412

    Google Scholar 

  29. Kühne W (1868) Lehrbuch der physiologischen Chemie. W. Engelmann, Leipzig, pp 49–50

    Google Scholar 

  30. Lagerkvist U (1998) DNA pioneers and their legacy. Yale University Press, New Haven

    Google Scholar 

  31. Leydig F (1857) Lehrbuch der Histologie des Menschen und der Thiere. Frankfurt am Main

  32. Lister J (1867) On the antiseptic principle of the practice of surgery. Lancet 2:353–356, 668–669

    Article  Google Scholar 

  33. Miescher F (1869a) Letter I; to Wilhelm His; Tübingen, February 26th, 1869. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 33–38

  34. Miescher F (1869b) Letter IV; to Miescher’s parents; Tübingen, August 21st 1869. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, p 39

  35. Miescher F (1869c) Letter V; to Wilhelm His; Leipzig, December 20th 1869. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 39–41

  36. Miescher F (1869d) Letter XVI; to Miescher’s parents; Leipzig, November 30th 1869. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 58–59

  37. Miescher F (1869e) Letter XVII; to Miescher’s parents; Leipzig, February 19th 1870. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 59

  38. Miescher F (1870) Nachträgliche Bemerkungen. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - A. Arbeiten von F. Miescher, vol 2. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 32–34

  39. Miescher F (1871a) Die Kerngebilde im Dotter des Hühnereies. Hoppe-Seyler’s medicinisch-chemischen Untersuchungen 4:502–509

    Google Scholar 

  40. Miescher F (1871b) Letter XXV; to Dr. Boehm in Würzburg; Basel, September 23rd, 1871. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 63–64

  41. Miescher F (1871c) Ueber die chemische Zusammensetzung der Eiterzellen. Medicinisch-chemische Untersuchungen 4:441–460

    Google Scholar 

  42. Miescher F (1872a) Letter VII; to Felix Hoppe-Seyler; Leipzig, March (?) 1870. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 44–46

  43. Miescher F (1872b) Letter XXVI; to Felix Hoppe-Seyler; Basel, Summer 1872. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 64–68

  44. Miescher F (1872c) Letter XXVII; to Felix Hoppe-Seyler; Evolena, Juli 20th 1872. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 68–69

  45. Miescher F (1872d) Letter XXVIII; to Dr. Boehm; Basel, May 2nd, 1872. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 70–73

  46. Miescher F (1873) Letter XXXIII; to Wilhelm His; Basel, July 31st, 1873. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 75

  47. Miescher F (1874a) Das Protamin - Eine neue organische Basis aus den Samenfäden des Rheinlachses. Berichte der deutschen chemischen Gesellschaft VII:376

    Article  Google Scholar 

  48. Miescher F (1874b) Die Spermatozoen einiger Wirbeltiere. Ein Beitrag zur Histochemie. Verhandlungen der naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Basel VI:138–208

    Google Scholar 

  49. Miescher F (1874c) Letter XXXV; to Wilhelm His; Basel, January 16th, 1874. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 76–77

  50. Miescher F (1877) Ueber das Ei. Vortrag, gehalten in der naturforschenden Gesellschaft den 7. Februar 1877. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher, vol 2. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 108–115

  51. Miescher F (1881) Ueber das Leben des Rheinlachses im Süsswasser. Archiv für Anatomie und Physiologie, Anatomische Abteilung:193–218

  52. Miescher F (1885) Bemerkungen zur Lehre von den Athembewegungen. Archiv für Anatomie und Physiologie, Physiologische Abteilung:355–380

  53. Miescher F (1888) Der Athemschieber - Ein neuer Apparat zur künstlichen Respiration und seine Controlle am lebenden Thiere. Centralblatt für Physiologie 14:342

    Google Scholar 

  54. Miescher F (1890) Biologische Studien über das Leben des Rheinlachses im Süsswasser. Vortrag, gehalten vor der naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Basel den 19. Februar 1890. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher, vol 2. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 304–324

  55. Miescher F (1891) Letter LXIX; to Wilhelm His; Basel, March, 2nd 1891. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 108–109

  56. Miescher F (1892a) Letter LXXIV; to Wilhelm His; Basel, October, 13th 1892. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 112–116

  57. Miescher F (1892b) Letter LXXV; to Wilhelm His; Basel, December, 17th 1892. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 116–117

  58. Miescher F (1892c) Physiologische Fragmente über den Rheinlachs, vorgetragen in der medic. Section der schweizerischen naturf. Gesellschaft in Basel 6. Sept. 1892. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher, vol 2. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 325–327

  59. Miescher F (1893) Letter LXXVIII; to Wilhelm His; Basel, October, 13th 1893. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 122–123

  60. Miescher F (1895) Letter XXXVIII; to Wilhelm His; Basel, December, 1st 1895. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher - Aus dem wissenschaftlichen Briefwechsel von F. Miescher, vol 1. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 79–80

  61. Miescher F (1897a) Bemerkungen zur Physiologie des Höhenklimas. In: Jaquet A, His W, et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher, vol 2. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 502–528

  62. Miescher F (1897b) Statistische und biologische Beiträge zur Kenntniss vom Leben des Rheinlachses im Süsswasser. In: His W et al (eds) Die Histochemischen und Physiologischen Arbeiten von Friedrich Miescher, vol 2. F. C. W. Vogel, Leipzig, pp 116–191

  63. Noyer-Weidner M, Schaffner W (1995) Felix Hoppe-Seyler (1825–1895), a Pioneer of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Biol Chem Hoppe Seyler 376:447–448

    PubMed  Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  64. Olby R (1969) Cell chemistry in Miescher’s day. Med Hist 13:377–382

    PubMed  CAS  Google Scholar 

  65. Olby RC (1994) The path to the double helix: the discovery of DNA. Dover Publications, Mineola

    Google Scholar 

  66. Perutz M (1995) Hoppe-Seyler, Stokes and haemoglobin. Biol Chem Hoppe Seyler 376:449–450

    PubMed  CAS  Google Scholar 

  67. Plósz P (1871) Ueber das chemische Verhalten der Kerne der Vogel- und Schlangenblutkörperchen. Medicinisch-chemische Untersuchungen 4:461–462

    Google Scholar 

  68. Portugal FH, Cohen JS (1977) A century of DNA. MIT, Cambridge, pp 6–30

    Google Scholar 

  69. Sapp J (1990) The nine lives of Gregor Mendel. In: Le Grand HE (ed) Experimental inquiries: historical, philosophical and social studies of experimentation in science (studies in history and philosophy of science). Kluwer, Dordrecht, pp 137–166

    Google Scholar 

  70. Schadewaldt H (1975) Zur Geschichte des Wundverbands. Langenbecks Arch. Chir 339:573–585

    PubMed  Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  71. Schmiedeberg O, Miescher F (1896) Physiologisch-chemische Untersuchungen über die Lachsmilch. Archiv für experimentelle Pathologie und Pharmakologie 37:100–155

    Article  Google Scholar 

  72. Shepherd GM (1991) Foundations of the neuron doctrine, 1st edn. Oxford University Press, New York

    Google Scholar 

  73. Strecker A (1850) Über die künstliche Bildung der Milchsäure und einen neuen, dem Glycocoll homologen Körper. Liebigs Ann Chem 75:27–45

    Google Scholar 

  74. Strecker A (1868) Ueber das Lecithin. Ann Chem Pharm 148:77

    Article  Google Scholar 

  75. Ulshöfer K (1964) Hugo von Mohl und die Entstehung der genetischen Zelltheorie. Die Medizinische Welt 17:981–985

    Google Scholar 

  76. Watson JD, Crick FH (1953a) Genetical implications of the structure of deoxyribonucleic acid. Nature 171:964–967

    PubMed  Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  77. Watson JD, Crick FHC (1953b) A structure for deoxyribose nucleic acid. Nature 171:737–738

    PubMed  Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  78. Wolf G (2003a) Friedrich Miescher, the man who discovered DNA. Chem Herit 21:10–11, 37–41

    Google Scholar 

  79. Wolf G (2003b) Historical note: Friedrich Miescher, the man who discovered DNA. Nucleus LXXXII:13–23

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgments

The author is very grateful to Drs. Alfred Gierer, Rebecca Kirk, Markus Kunze, Alfons Renz, Helia B. Schönthaler, and John P. Vessey for helpful discussions and for critically reading this manuscript. The author would also like to thank Dr. Manuela Rohrmoser, Vienna University Library, for help in obtaining literature. I am particularly grateful to Dr. Ingmar Hörr for presenting me with a volume of Miescher’s collected letters and publications.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Ralf Dahm.

Electronic supplementary material

Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

Scans of Friedrich Miescher’s letter of the 26th of February 1869 to Wilhelm His, a letter to an unnamed friend, and two letters of the 11th of June and the 21st August 1869 to his parents as they were re-printed in the collection of Friedrich Miescher’s scientific publications, lecture manuscripts and scientific correspondence published by Wilhelm His and others (His 1897b, 1897c) after Miescher’s death. (PDF 1202 kb)

Scan of Friedrich Miescher’s publication of 1871 describing his discovery of nuclein (DNA) as it was re-printed in the collection of Friedrich Miescher’s scientific publications, lecture manuscripts and scientific correspondence published by Wilhelm His and others (His 1897b, 1897c) after Miescher’s death. (PDF 3545 kb)

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Dahm, R. Discovering DNA: Friedrich Miescher and the early years of nucleic acid research. Hum Genet 122, 565–581 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00439-007-0433-0

Download citation

Keywords

  • Lecithin
  • Sperm Cell
  • Double Helix
  • Dilute Hydrochloric Acid
  • Asymmetric Carbon Atom