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Parasitology Research

, Volume 115, Issue 3, pp 1339–1344 | Cite as

First molecular detection of Leishmania tarentolae-like DNA in Sergentomyia minuta in Spain

  • Daniel Bravo-Barriga
  • Ricardo Parreira
  • Carla Maia
  • Juan Blanco-Ciudad
  • Maria Odete Afonso
  • Eva Frontera
  • Lenea Campino
  • Juan Enrique Pérez-Martín
  • Francisco Javier Serrano Aguilera
  • David ReinaEmail author
Short Communication

Abstract

Phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera, Psychodidae) are vectors of multiple Leishmania species, among which Leishmania infantum stands out as a being frequently pathogenic to humans and dogs in Mediterranean countries. In this study, Sergentomyia minuta sand flies were collected using CDC miniature light traps in different 431 biotopes from Southwest Spain. A total of 114 females were tested for the presence of Leishmania DNA by targeting ITS-1 and cyt-B sequences by PCR. Leishmania DNA was detected in one S. minuta. Characterization of the obtained DNA sequences by phylogenetic analyses revealed close relatedness with Leishmania tarentolae Wenyon, 1921 as well as with both human and canine pathogenic strains of Asian origin (China), previously described as Leishmania sp. To our knowledge, this is the first report of phlebotomine sand flies naturally infected with L. tarentolae-like in Spain. The possible infection of sand flies with novel Leishmania species should be taken into consideration in epidemiological studies of vector species in areas where leishmaniosis is endemic.

Keywords

Leishmania tarentolae-like Sergentomyia minuta Phlebotomine sand flies Vectors Southwest Spain 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge Prof. J. Votypka (Charles University, Czech Republic) for kindly providing a DNA extract of Leishmania tarentolae Wenyon, 1921.

This work was funded through the research project (IB10044) of the “Consejería de Economía, Comercio e Innovación” of the Extremadura regional Government (Spain).

DBB holds a scholarship from the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports of Spain (FPU grant AP2010-5854) and CM holds a scholarship from Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Ministério da Educação e Ciência, Portugal (SFRH/BPD/44082/2008).

Work done during the stay in the Global Health and Tropical Medicine in Lisbon, funded by Banco Santander, SA through program “Becas Iberoamérica. Jóvenes Profesores e Investigadores. Santander Universidades 2014”.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Bravo-Barriga
    • 1
  • Ricardo Parreira
    • 3
  • Carla Maia
    • 2
  • Juan Blanco-Ciudad
    • 1
  • Maria Odete Afonso
    • 2
  • Eva Frontera
    • 1
  • Lenea Campino
    • 2
  • Juan Enrique Pérez-Martín
    • 1
  • Francisco Javier Serrano Aguilera
    • 1
  • David Reina
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases, Animal Health Department, Veterinary FacultyUniversity of ExtremaduraCáceresSpain
  2. 2.Global Health and Tropical Medicine (GHTM), Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical (IHMT)Universidade Nova de Lisboa (UNL), Unidade de Parasitologia MédicaLisbonPortugal
  3. 3.Global Health and Tropical Medicine (GHTM), Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical (IHMT)Universidade Nova de Lisboa (UNL), Grupo de Virologia/Unidade de Microbiología MédicaLisbonPortugal

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