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Parasitology Research

, Volume 114, Issue 2, pp 753–757 | Cite as

Serodiagnosis of sparganosis by ELISA using recombinant cysteine protease of Spirometra erinaceieuropaei spargana

  • Li Na Liu
  • Xi Zhang
  • Peng Jiang
  • Ruo Dan Liu
  • Jian Zhou
  • Rui Zhe He
  • Jing Cui
  • Zhong Quan Wang
Short Communication

Abstract

The Spirometra erinaceieuropaei cysteine protease (SeCP) gene encoding a 36 kDa protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the potential of recombinant SeCP protein (rSeCP) as an antigen for the serodiagnosis of sparganosis was investigated by ELISA and compared with those of ELISA with sparganum excretory–secretory (ES) antigens. The sensitivity of rSeCP-ELISA and ES-ELISA was 96.67 % (29/30) and 100 % (30/30) respectively, for the detection of anti-sparganum IgG antibodies in sera of the experimentally infected mice (P > 0.05), and the specificities of both ELISA were 100 % (77/77). In heavily, moderately, and lightly infected mice (five, three, and one larvae per mouse), anti-sparganum antibodies were firstly detected by rSeCP-ELISA at 10–12 days post-infection (dpi), respectively, and then continued to increase with a detection rate of 100 % at 14–22 dpi. In three groups of infected mice, the anti-sparganum antibody levels at different times after infection were statistically different (P < 0.05). The results showed that the rSeCP might be a potential candidate antigen for early and specific serodiagnosis of sparganosis. But, it needs to be further evaluated with sera of the patients with sparganosis and other helminthiasis.

Keywords

Sparganosis Spirometra erinaceieuropaei Cysteine protease Serodiagnosis ELISA 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81172612) and the Project of Henan Medical Science and Technology (No. 201003006).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li Na Liu
    • 1
  • Xi Zhang
    • 1
  • Peng Jiang
    • 1
  • Ruo Dan Liu
    • 1
  • Jian Zhou
    • 1
  • Rui Zhe He
    • 1
  • Jing Cui
    • 1
  • Zhong Quan Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Parasitology, Medical CollegeZhengzhou UniversityZhengzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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