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Parasitology Research

, Volume 101, Issue 3, pp 527–531 | Cite as

Repellent and adulticide efficacy of a combination containing 10% imidacloprid and 50% permethrin against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes on dogs

  • Sonthaya TiawsirisupEmail author
  • Suwannee Nithiuthai
  • Morakot Kaewthamasorn
Original Paper

Abstract

This study was conducted to assess the repellent and adulticide efficacy of the combination containing 10% imidacloprid and 50% permethrin against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes on dogs. Blood-feeding success rates of the mosquitoes that were exposed to the treated dogs were 4.9 and 4.4% on days 3 and 7 post the combination application (PCA), respectively, and blood-feeding success rates increased to 6.3, 12.8, and 24.5% on days 14, 21, and 28 PCA, respectively. Blood-feeding success rates between the mosquitoes that were exposed to the treated and untreated control dogs on days 3, 7, 14, and 21 PCA were significantly different. All mosquitoes that were exposed to the treated dogs on day 3 PCA died, and mortality rates decreased to 97.1, 77.8, 40.4, and 2.1% on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 PCA, respectively. Mortality rates between the mosquitoes that were exposed to the treated and untreated control dogs on days 3, 7, 14, and 21 PCA were significantly different. This study suggested that this combination can be used to repel and kill mosquitoes on dogs; however, the application of this insecticide combination on dogs needs to be repeated every 3–4 weeks.

Keywords

Imidacloprid Untreated Control Group Repellent Effect Nitroguanidine Insecticide Efficacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

We would like to thank the Department of Parasitology, University of Georgia, USA for providing us the Aedes aegypti eggs. This study was financially supported by Bayer Thai, Thailand.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sonthaya Tiawsirisup
    • 1
    Email author
  • Suwannee Nithiuthai
    • 1
  • Morakot Kaewthamasorn
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Veterinary Parasitology, Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary ScienceChulalongkorn UniversityBangkokThailand

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