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Parasitology Research

, Volume 101, Issue 3, pp 511–515 | Cite as

Identification of differentially expressed genes in female Culex pipiens pallens

  • Hong-Hong Chen
  • Ren-Li ZhangEmail author
  • Yi-Jie Geng
  • Jin-Quan Cheng
  • Shun-Xiang Zhang
  • Da-Na Huang
  • Lei Yu
  • Shi-Tong Gao
  • Xing-Quan ZhuEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Culex pipiens pallens is the mosquito vector of a number of human pathogens such as Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and epidemic encephalitis B virus. Female C. pipiens pallens play an important role in transmitting pathogens by sucking blood, which is essential for reproduction. In the present study, a subtractive cDNA library for female C. pipiens pallens was constructed by the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique and then 100 clones from the female SSH library were sequenced and analyzed. Female-differentially expressed genes in C. pipiens pallens were screened using semiquantitative RT-PCR. The full-length cDNA of an EST sequence (fs68) that was specifically expressed in female C. pipiens pallens was characterized by 3′ and 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The characteristics of the female-specific gene were further analyzed using bioinformatics and Northern blot. It was shown that the female-specific gene was a previously uncharacterized gene and may encode a salivary peptide. This putative salivary peptide could be a very important molecule in the blood feeding of female C. pipiens pallens.

Keywords

Suppression Subtractive Hybridization Blood Feeding Subtractive cDNA Library Epidemic Encephalitis Pipiens Pallens 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Project support was provided in part by a grant from the Shenzhen Municipal Bureau of Science and Technology (grant no. JH200505300494A) to RLZ and from the China National Science Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists (grant no. 30225033) to XQZ.

Declaration

The experiments comply with the current laws of the country in which the experiments were performed.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hong-Hong Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ren-Li Zhang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yi-Jie Geng
    • 1
  • Jin-Quan Cheng
    • 1
  • Shun-Xiang Zhang
    • 1
  • Da-Na Huang
    • 1
  • Lei Yu
    • 1
  • Shi-Tong Gao
    • 1
  • Xing-Quan Zhu
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratory of Molecular BiologyShenzhen Center for Disease Control and PreventionShenzhenPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.College of Veterinary MedicineSouth China Agricultural UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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