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European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 165, Issue 4, pp 270–272 | Cite as

An unexpected finding in a child with rectal blood loss using video capsule endoscopy

  • Merit M. TabbersEmail author
  • Karlien F. Bruin
  • Jan A. Taminiau
  • Obbe F. Norbruis
  • Marc A. Benninga
Short Report

Introduction

Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has recently enabled direct visualization of the small bowel mucosa. It is a non-invasive, painless procedure and provides detailed images from areas not accessible utilizing other radiographic or endoscopic methods. Capsule endoscopy has been reported to have a diagnostic yield for small bowel pathology greater than that derived from regular endoscopic and radiographic examinations [1, 3]. The diagnosis of obscure bleeding is currently the most frequent indication for capsule endoscopy in adults [1]. Although VCE is becoming an increasingly popular procedure, well-designed studies on its clinical implications and application are only just emerging. In this report, we present a boy with rectal blood loss. Despite a negative result from radionuclide imaging, there was still a high clinical suspicion of a Meckel’s diverticulum. Consequently, VCE was performed with the purpose of avoiding unnecessary surgical treatment.

Case report

An 8-year-old...

Keywords

Celiac Disease Intussusception Pertechnetate Pyloric Stenosis Chronic Abdominal Pain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Merit M. Tabbers
    • 1
    Email author
  • Karlien F. Bruin
    • 2
  • Jan A. Taminiau
    • 1
  • Obbe F. Norbruis
    • 3
  • Marc A. Benninga
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Emma’s Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical CenterUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical CenterUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Princess Amalia Children’s ClinicIsala Clinics ZwolleZwolleThe Netherlands

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