European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 163, Issue 2, pp 105–107 | Cite as

The aetiology of paediatric inflammatory vulvovaginitis

  • Juan Cuadros
  • Ana Mazón
  • Rocío Martinez
  • Pilar González
  • Alberto Gil-Setas
  • Uxua Flores
  • Beatriz Orden
  • Peña Gómez-Herruz
  • Rosario Millan
Original Paper

Abstract

Vulvovaginitis is the most common gynaecological problem in prepubertal girls and clear-cut data on the microbial aetiology of moderate to severe infections are lacking. Many microorganisms have been reported in several studies, but frequently the paediatrician does not know the pathogenic significance of an isolate reported in vaginal specimens of girls with vulvovaginitis. A multicentre study was performed, selecting 74 girls aged 2 to 12 years old with a clinical picture of vulvovaginitis and inflammatory cells on Gram stain. All the specimens were cultured following standard microbiological techniques and the paediatricians completed a questionnaire to highlight risk factors after interviewing the parents or tutors. The data were compared with those obtained in a control group of 11 girls without vulvovaginitis attending a clinic. Streptococcus pyogenes and Haemophilus spp.were isolated in 47 and 12 cases, respectively. Upper respiratory infection in the previous month ( P <0.001) and vulvovaginitis in the previous year ( P <0.05) were identified as significant risk factors. Foreign bodies, sexual abuse, poor hygiene and bad socioeconomic situation were not identified as risk factors for the infection. Conclusion: Paediatric inflammatory vulvovaginitis is mainly caused by pathogens of the upper respiratory tract and the most common risk factor for this infection is to have suffered an upper respiratory tract infection in the previous month.

Keywords

Paediatric vulvovaginitis  Haemophilus spp.  Streptococcus pyogenes 

Abbreviations

HI

Haemophilus influenzae

PIV

paediatric inflammatory vulvovaginitis

SP

Streptococcus pyogenes

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juan Cuadros
    • 1
  • Ana Mazón
    • 2
  • Rocío Martinez
    • 3
  • Pilar González
    • 4
  • Alberto Gil-Setas
    • 2
  • Uxua Flores
    • 5
  • Beatriz Orden
    • 3
  • Peña Gómez-Herruz
    • 1
  • Rosario Millan
    • 3
  1. 1.Servicio de Microbiología y ParasitologíaMadrid Spain
  2. 2.Laboratorio de MicrobiologíaAmbulatorio General SolchagaPamplona, Navarra Spain
  3. 3.Laboratorio de MicrobiologíaCE ArgüellesMadrid Spain
  4. 4.Servicio de PediatríaHospital Príncipe de AsturiasMadrid Spain
  5. 5.Servicio de PediatríaCentro de Salud de NoainNavarra Spain

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