Advertisement

Planta

, Volume 240, Issue 5, pp 1139–1146 | Cite as

Beauty will save the world, but will the world save beauty? The case of the highly endangered Vavilovia formosa (Stev.) Fed.

  • Aleksandar MikićEmail author
  • Petr Smýkal
  • Gregory Kenicer
  • Margarita Vishnyakova
  • Nune Sarukhanyan
  • Janna A. Akopian
  • Armen Vanyan
  • Ivan Gabrielyan
  • Iva Smýkalová
  • Ekaterina Sherbakova
  • Lana Zorić
  • Jovanka Atlagić
  • Tijana Zeremski-Škorić
  • Branko Ćupina
  • Đorđe Krstić
  • Igor Jajić
  • Svetlana Antanasović
  • Vuk Đorđević
  • Vojislav Mihailović
  • Alexandr Ivanov
  • Sergio Ochatt
  • Cengiz Toker
  • Bojan Zlatković
  • Mike Ambrose
Short Communication

Abstract

Main conclusion

Vavilovia formosa (Stev.) Fed. is a scientifically valuable common ancestor of the plant tribe Fabeae and also important in breeding and agronomy studies of the cultivated Fabeae, but it is close to extinction. A concerted academic and geovernmental effort is needed to save it.

Abstract

Since 2007, an informal international group of researchers on legumes has been working to increase awareness of Vavilovia formosa (Stev.) Fed., a relict and endangered wild-land relative to crop plant species. A majority of the modern botanical classifications place it within the tribe Fabeae, together with the genera vetchling (Lathyrus L.), lentil (Lens Mill.), pea (Pisum L.) and vetch (Vicia L.). V. formosa is encountered at altitudes from 1,500 m up to 3,500 m in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Russia, Syria and Turkey. This species may be of extraordinary importance for broadening current scientific knowledge on legume evolution and taxonomy because of its proximity to the hypothetical common ancestor of the tribe Fabeae, as well as for breeding and agronomy of the cultivated Fabeae species due to its perenniality and stress resistance. All this may be feasible only if a concerted and long-term conservation strategy is established and carried out by both academic and geovernmental authorities. The existing populations of V. formosa are in serious danger of extinction. The main threats are domestic and wild animal grazing, foraging, and early frosts in late summer. A long-term strategy to save V. formosa from extinction and to sustain its use in both basic and applied research comprises much improved in situ preservation, greater efforts for an ex situ conservation, and novel approaches of in vitro propagation.

Keywords

Endangered plants Ex situ conservation Fabeae In situ conservation Relict plants Vavilovia formosa 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research is a part of the projects ERA 168/01 SEELEGUMES within FP7-supported SEE-ERA.NET Plus programme of the European Union, TR-31016 and TR-31024 of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia and IGA PrF-2012-001 of the Grant Agency of Palacký University.

The authors are deeply grateful to Nigel Maxted, Andrey Sinjushin, Alexandra Belyakova, Ivan Yan’kov, Noel Ellis and many other dear colleagues whose contribution to the research on Vavilovia formosa is priceless.

In memory of C. Steven, A.A. Fedorov, R.H. Makasheva, A.A. Golubev and N.I. Vavilov.

To Fyodor M. Dostoevsky and his belief in and celebration of immortal beauty of the world.

References

  1. Akopian JA, Gabrielyan IG (2008) On high-mountain pea Vavilovia formosa (Stev.) Fed. (Fabaceae) in Armenia. Crop Wild Relat Newsl 6:26–27Google Scholar
  2. Akopian J, Sarukhanyan N, Gabrielyan I, Vanyan A, Mikić A, Smýkal P, Kenicer G, Vishnyakova M, Sinjushin A, Demidenko N, Ambrose M (2010) Reports on establishing an ex situ site for ‘beautiful’ vavilovia (Vavilovia formosa) in Armenia. Genet Resour Crop Evol 57:1127–1134CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Atlagić J, Mikić A, Terzić S, Zorić L, Zeremski-Škorić T, Mihailović V, Ćupina B (2010) Contributions to the characterization of Vavilovia formosa (syn. Pisum formosum). II. Morphology of androecium and ginoecium and mitosis. Pisum Genet 42:25–27Google Scholar
  4. Ćupina B, Zlatković B, Smýkal P, Mikić A, Jajić I, Zeremski-Škorić T, Medović A (2011) In situ evaluation of a Pisum sativum subsp. elatius population from the valley of the river Pčinja in southeast Serbia. Pisum Genet 43:20–24Google Scholar
  5. Fedorov AA (1939) Wild high-mountain peas of Caucasus. Trans Biol Instit 1:39–79Google Scholar
  6. Gabrielyan ET (ed) (1990) Vavilovia formosa (Stev.) Fed. Red Data Book of Armenia: plants. Ayastan, Yerevan, p 123Google Scholar
  7. Golubev AA (1990) Habitats, collection, cultivation and hybridization of Vavilovia formosa Fed. Bull Appl Bot Genet Plant Breed 135:67–75Google Scholar
  8. Makasheva RK, Drozd AM, Adamova OP, Golubev AA (1973) Perennial pea. Bull Appl Bot Genet Plant Breed 51:44–56Google Scholar
  9. Maxted N, Ambrose M (2001) Peas (Pisum L.). In: Maxted N, Bennett SJ (eds) Plant genetic resources of legumes in the Mediterranean. Kluwer, Dordrecht, pp 181–190CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Mikić A, Smýkal P, Kenicer G, Vishnyakova M, Akopian J, Sarukhanyan N, Gabrielyan I, Vanyan A, Toker C, Ćupina B, Ambrose M, Mihailović V, Ellis N (2009) A revival of the research on beautiful vavilovia (Vavilovia formosa syn. Pisum formosum). Pisum Genet 41:34–39Google Scholar
  11. Mikić A, Smykal P, Kenicer G, Sarukhanyan N, Akopian J, Gabrielyan I, Vanyan A, Sinjushin A, Demidenko N, Ćupina B, Mihailović V, Vishnyakova M, Ambrose M (2010) Achievements in research on vavilovia (Vavilovia formosa (Stev.) Fed.), a legume crop wild relative. Ratar Povrt 47:387–394Google Scholar
  12. Mikić A, Sarukhanyan N, Akopian J, Vanyan A, Gabrielyan I, Torchyan V, Sarukhanyan S, Ćupina B, Zeremski-Škorić T, Krstić Đ, Smýkal P, Kenicer G, Ambrose M (2011) Conservation strategies of Vavilovia formosa (syn. Pisum formosum), a high-mountainous pea relative in Armenia. Grassland Sci Europe 16:371–373Google Scholar
  13. Mikić A, Smýkal P, Kenicer G, Vishnyakova M, Sarukhanyan N, Akopian J, Vanyan A, Gabrielyan I, Smýkalová I, Sherbakova E, Zorić L, Atlagić J, Zeremski-Škorić T, Ćupina B, Krstić Ð, Jajić I, Antanasović S, Ðorđević V, Mihailović V, Ivanov A, Ochatt S, Ambrose M (2013) The bicentenary of the research on ‘beautiful’ vavilovia (Vavilovia formosa), a legume crop wild relative with taxonomic and agronomic potential. Bot J Linn Soc 172:524–531CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Oskoueiyan R, Osaloo SK, Maassoumi AA, Nejadsattari T, Mozaffarian V (2010) Phylogenetic status of Vavilovia formosa (Fabaceae–Fabeae) based on nrDNA ITS and cpDNA sequences. Biochem Syst Ecol 38:313–319CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Safronova VI, Kimeklis AK, Chizhevskaya EP, Belimov AA, Andronov EE, Pinaev AG, Pukhaev AR, Popov KP, Tikhonovich IA (2014) Genetic diversity of rhizobia isolated from nodules of the relic species Vavilovia formosa (Stev.) Fed. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 105:389–399PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Sarukhanyan NG, Akopian JA, Gabrielyan IG, Vanyan AG (2009) Wild pea, Vavilovia formosa (Stev.) Fed. (Fabaceae) in situ investigation in Armenia. Grain Legum 52:25–26Google Scholar
  17. Sinjushin AA, Belyakova AS (2010) On intraspecific variation of Vavilovia formosa (Stev.) Fed. (= Pisum formosum (Stev.) Alef.: Fabeae). Pisum Genet 42:31–34Google Scholar
  18. Smýkal P, Kenicer G, Mikić A (2009) ‘Beautiful vavilovia’ (Vavilovia formosa) and molecular taxonomy of tribe Fabeae. Book of Abstracts, IV Congress of the Serbian Genetic Society, Tara, p 166Google Scholar
  19. Steven C (1812) Orobus formosus Steven. Mém Soc Imp Nat Mosc 4:50Google Scholar
  20. Vishnyakova M, Yan’kov I, Mikić A, Ćupina B (2007) Vavilovia formosa or Pisum formosum? In search of new answers to an old question. Book of abstracts, 6th European conference on grain legumes, Lisbon, pp 122–123Google Scholar
  21. Zeremski-Škorić T, Mikić A, Sarukhanyan N, Vanyan A, Akopian J, Gabrielyan I, Smýkal P, Kenicer G, Vishnyakova M, Ambrose M (2010) Contributions to the characterization of Vavilovia formosa (syn. Pisum formosum). III. Contents of macro- and microelements. Pisum Genet 42:28–30Google Scholar
  22. Zorić L, Luković J, Mikić A, Akopian J, Gabrielyan I, Sarukhanyan N, Vanyan A, Smýkal P, Kenicer G, Vishnyakova M, Ambrose M (2010) Contributions to the characterization of Vavilovia formosa (Stev.) Fed. I. Anatomy of stem, leaf and calyx. Pisum Genet 42:21–24Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aleksandar Mikić
    • 1
    Email author
  • Petr Smýkal
    • 2
  • Gregory Kenicer
    • 3
  • Margarita Vishnyakova
    • 4
  • Nune Sarukhanyan
    • 5
  • Janna A. Akopian
    • 6
  • Armen Vanyan
    • 5
  • Ivan Gabrielyan
    • 6
  • Iva Smýkalová
    • 7
  • Ekaterina Sherbakova
    • 6
  • Lana Zorić
    • 8
  • Jovanka Atlagić
    • 1
  • Tijana Zeremski-Škorić
    • 1
  • Branko Ćupina
    • 9
  • Đorđe Krstić
    • 9
  • Igor Jajić
    • 9
  • Svetlana Antanasović
    • 9
  • Vuk Đorđević
    • 1
  • Vojislav Mihailović
    • 1
  • Alexandr Ivanov
    • 10
  • Sergio Ochatt
    • 11
  • Cengiz Toker
    • 12
  • Bojan Zlatković
    • 13
  • Mike Ambrose
    • 14
  1. 1.Institute of Field and Vegetable CropsNovi SadSerbia
  2. 2.Palacký University at OlomoucOlomoucCzech Republic
  3. 3.Royal Botanical Garden EdinburghEdinburghUK
  4. 4.State Scientific Centre N.I. Vavilov All-Russian Research Institute of Plant Industry of Russian Academy of Agricultural ScienceSt. PetersburgRussia
  5. 5.Green Lane Agricultural Assistance NGOYerevanArmenia
  6. 6.National Academy of Sciences, Institute of BotanyYerevanArmenia
  7. 7.Agritec Plant Research Ltd.ŠumperkCzech Republic
  8. 8.Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of SciencesUniversity of Novi SadNovi SadSerbia
  9. 9.Department of Field and Vegetable Crops, Faculty of AgricultureUniversity of Novi SadNovi SadSerbia
  10. 10.Botany Department HerbariumStavropol State UniversityStavropolRussia
  11. 11.INRA, UMR1347, PCMVDijonFrance
  12. 12.Akdeniz UniversityAntalyaTurkey
  13. 13.Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Sciences and MathematicsUniversity of NišNišSerbia
  14. 14.Department of Crop GeneticsJohn Innes CentreNorwichUK

Personalised recommendations