Blood lactate concentration at the maximal lactate steady state is not dependent on endurance capacity in healthy recreationally trained individuals

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate the independent relationship between maximal lactate steady state (MLSS), blood lactate concentration [La] and exercise performance as reported frequently. Sixty-two subjects with a wide range of endurance performance (MLSS power output 199 ± 55 W; range: 100–302 W) were tested on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. One-min incremental exercise tests were conducted to determine maximal variables as well as the respiratory compensation point (RCP) and the second lactate turn point (LTP2). Several continuous exercise tests were performed to determine the MLSS. Subjects were divided into three clusters of exercise performance. Dietary control was employed throughout all testing. No significant correlation was found between MLSS [La] and power output at MLSS. Additionally, the three clusters of subjects with different endurance performance levels based on power output at MLSS showed no significant difference for MLSS [La]. MLSS [La] was not significantly different between men and women (average of 4.80 ± 1.50 vs. 5.22 ± 1.52 mmol l−1). MLSS [La] was significantly related to [La] at RCP, LTP2 and at maximal power. The results of this study support previous findings that MLSS [La] is independent of endurance performance. Additionally, MLSS [La] was not influenced by sex. Correlations found between MLSS [La] and [La] at maximal power and at designated anaerobic thresholds indicate only an association of [La] response during incremental and MLSS exercise when utilizing cycle ergometry.

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Correspondence to Serge P. von Duvillard.

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Communicated by Susan A. Ward.

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Smekal, G., von Duvillard, S.P., Pokan, R. et al. Blood lactate concentration at the maximal lactate steady state is not dependent on endurance capacity in healthy recreationally trained individuals. Eur J Appl Physiol 112, 3079–3086 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-011-2283-7

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Keywords

  • Blood lactate response
  • Maximal lactate steady state
  • Endurance training