Advertisement

Occupational skin-care management

  • Thomas L. Diepgen
  • Howard Maibach
Editorial

Occupational skin-care management

Work-related dermatoses, in particular hand dermatitis, are still among the most prevalent occupational diseases worldwide, and the social and economic impact of these diseases is very high (Diepgen and Coenraads 1999). The majority of work-related dermatoses (more than 95%) are subtypes of contact dermatitis; the rest are other dermatoses such as skin cancer, contact urticaria, oil acne, chloracne, chemically induced leucoderma, and infections. Contact dermatitis is a pattern of inflammatory responses of the skin that may occur as a result of contact with external factors (allergens, irritants). There is a vast literature on work-related dermatoses, particularly case reports and investigative clinical studies; their prevention and management, however, has received little attention. Therefore, this issue of IAOEHis focusing on different aspects of occupational skin-care management. Most of the articles are based on the results of a state-of-the-art...

References

  1. Dickel H, Kuss O, Schmidt A, Diepgen TL (2002) Impact of preventive strategies on trend of occupational skin disease in hairdressers: population-based register study. Br Med J 324:1422–1423CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Diepgen TL, Coenraads PJ (1999) The epidemiology of occupational contact dermatitis. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 72:496–506CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Schnetz E, Diepgen TL, Elsner P, Frosch PJ, Klotz AJ, Kresken J, Kuss O, Merk H, Schwanitz HJ, Wigger-Alberti W, Fartasch M (2000) Multicentre study for the development of an in vivo model to evaluate the influence of topical formulations on irritation. Contact Dermatitis 42:336-243PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas L. Diepgen
  • Howard Maibach

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations