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Population data of 30 insertion–deletion markers in four Chinese populations

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26 February 2020 ‘Concerns have been raised about the ethics approval and informed consent procedures related to the research reported in this paper. The paper includes the following author declarations: “All participants following informed consent were chosen among individuals whose ancestors had lived in the region for at least three generations. This study was conducted in accordance with the human and ethical research principles of Shantou University, Shantou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China.”. Editorial action will be taken as appropriate once an investigation of the concerns is complete and all parties have been given an opportunity to respond in full.’

Abstract

In this study, we assessed 30 insertion–deletion polymorphisms (Indels) (Investigator DIPplex® kit) in four Chinese populations (n = 952) and evaluated their usefulness in forensic genetic applications. After the Bonferroni correction at a 95 % significance level (p = 0.0017), there were no deviations from the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium observed except for the HLD114 locus in the Tibetan ethnic group studied. A high level of discrimination power was observed for the DIPplex® kit in four sample populations (CDP > 0.9999) and the combined random match probabilities (CMP) were in the range of 1.4766 × 10−11 to 5.2742 × 10−13. Four Indels have been selected for further analyses as possible ancestry informative single nucleotide polymorphisms. The study support that the Investigator DIPplex® kit provides a powerful supplement to standard short tandem repeat-based kits for individual identification and kinship analysis in the Chinese population.

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  • 26 February 2020

    ‘Concerns have been raised about the ethics approval and informed consent procedures related to the research reported in this paper. The paper includes the following author declarations: “All participants following informed consent were chosen among individuals whose ancestors had lived in the region for at least three generations. This study was conducted in accordance with the human and ethical research principles of Shantou University, Shantou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China.”. Editorial action will be taken as appropriate once an investigation of the concerns is complete and all parties have been given an opportunity to respond in full.’

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Acknowledgments

We thank all sample donors for their contributions to this work and all those who helped with sample collection. This study was supported by The National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC. No. 81172902), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (No. NCET-10-0773), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation funded project (No.2013M530371), and the Li Ka Shing Foundation, Hong Kong.

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Correspondence to Shuhua Ma.

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Shi, M., Liu, Y., Bai, R. et al. Population data of 30 insertion–deletion markers in four Chinese populations. Int J Legal Med 129, 53–56 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00414-014-1091-0

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