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International Journal of Legal Medicine

, Volume 128, Issue 1, pp 27–31 | Cite as

Characterisation of novel and rare Y-chromosome short tandem repeat alleles in self-declared South Australian Aboriginal database

  • Tegan E. Collins
  • Renee Ottens
  • Kaye N. Ballantyne
  • Nano Nagle
  • Julianne Henry
  • Duncan Taylor
  • Michael G. Gardner
  • Alison J. Fitch
  • Amanda Goodman
  • Roland A. H. van Oorschot
  • R. John Mitchell
  • Adrian Linacre
Original Article

Abstract

Y-chromosome short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are used in forensic science laboratories all over the world, as their application is wide and often vital in solving casework. Analysis of an in-house database of South Australian self-declared Aboriginal males held by Forensic Science South Australia (FSSA) using the Applied Biosystem’s AmpFℓSTR® Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit revealed 43 variant Y-STR alleles at 6 of the 17 loci. All variant alleles were sequenced to determine the exact repeat structure for each. As a high level of admixture has previously been found within the SA Aboriginal database, samples were haplogrouped using Y-SNPs to determine their likely geographical origin. Although a number of variant alleles were associated with non-Aboriginal Y-haplogroups, a high frequency was observed within the Australian K-M9 lineage. Detailed knowledge of these variant alleles may have further application in the development of new DNA markers for identification purposes, and in population and evolutionary studies of Australian Aborigines.

Keywords

Forensic science Human identification Y-chromosome Y-STR Australian Aboriginal males 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Funding from the Ministry of Justice South Australia and Forensic Science South Australia (FSSA) supported this project. We also thank anonymous reviewers, whose comments improved this work.

Supplementary material

414_2013_911_MOESM1_ESM.doc (42 kb)
Supplementary Table 1 PCR primer references and protocols for the amplification and sequencing of the Y-STR loci examined in this study. For PCR conditions * denotes a PCR performed on Palm-Cycler (Corbett Research, Cambridge, UK) and # for Bio-Rad C1000™ Thermal Cycler or a Labnet MultiGene™ Gradient Thermal Cycler (Labnet International, Inc.) (DOC 42 kb)
414_2013_911_Fig2_ESM.jpg (897 kb)
Supplementary Figure 1

Median joining network of 766 self-declared Australian Aboriginal 14 locus Y-STR haplotypes (excluding DYS385 and DYS456). The K-M9 cluster has been enlarged for clarity. Individuals carrying the DYS456 11 allele are highlighted with a red box. Note that even in the absence of DYS456 as a classifying locus, individuals which display the short allele still cluster together in the network, suggesting a common origin (JPEG 186 kb)

414_2013_911_MOESM2_ESM.tif (2.8 mb)
High Resolution Image (TIFF 2.82 MB)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tegan E. Collins
    • 1
  • Renee Ottens
    • 2
  • Kaye N. Ballantyne
    • 3
  • Nano Nagle
    • 4
  • Julianne Henry
    • 1
  • Duncan Taylor
    • 1
  • Michael G. Gardner
    • 2
    • 6
  • Alison J. Fitch
    • 5
  • Amanda Goodman
    • 2
  • Roland A. H. van Oorschot
    • 3
  • R. John Mitchell
    • 4
  • Adrian Linacre
    • 2
  1. 1.Forensic Science South AustraliaAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.School of Biological SciencesFlinders UniversityAdelaideAustralia
  3. 3.Office of the Chief Forensic Scientist, Victoria Police Forensic Services DepartmentMacleodAustralia
  4. 4.Department of GeneticsLa Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  5. 5.School of Molecular and Biomedical ScienceThe University of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia
  6. 6.Evolutionary Biology UnitSouth Australian MuseumAdelaideAustralia

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