Temperature and burn injury prediction of human skin exposed to microwaves: a model analysis

Abstract

A one-dimensional multi-layer model is presented to characterize skin temperature rises and burn processes resulting from skin exposure to microwaves. Temperature variations and damage function analyses in the skin tissue exposed to microwaves were predicted depending on blood perfusion rate, thermal conductivity, power density, and exposure time. Thermal wave model was applied and the bio-heat transfer equation was solved using the finite difference time domain method. The thermal wave model of bio-heat transfer predicts a lower temperature rise than a model that uses Pennes’ equation. When approaching steady state, the solutions overlaps with that obtained using the Pennes’ equation. The results obtained may help to analyze the consequences of short-time high-power MW exposures in biological tissues.

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Acknowledgments

This study was supported by DPT Project 2007K120530 and Department of Scientific Research Project Management (BAPYB) of Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey.

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Correspondence to Sukru Ozen.

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Ozen, S., Helhel, S. & Bilgin, S. Temperature and burn injury prediction of human skin exposed to microwaves: a model analysis. Radiat Environ Biophys 50, 483–489 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00411-011-0364-y

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Keywords

  • Skin Tissue
  • Damage Function
  • Specific Absorption Rate
  • Dermis Layer
  • Thermal Relaxation Time