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Plasma levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein β in symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease

  • Panagiotis AlexopoulosEmail author
  • Lena-Sophie Gleixner
  • Lukas Werle
  • Felix Buhl
  • Nathalie Thierjung
  • Evangelia Giourou
  • Simone M. Kagerbauer
  • Philippos Gourzis
  • Hubert Kübler
  • Timo Grimmer
  • Igor Yakushev
  • Jan Martin
  • Alexander Kurz
  • Robert Perneczky
Short Communication

Abstract

The established biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) require invasive endeavours or presuppose sophisticated technical equipment. Consequently, new biomarkers are needed. Here, we report that plasma levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein β (sAPPβ), a protein of the initial phase of the amyloid cascade, were significantly lower in patients with symptomatic AD (21 with mild cognitive impairment due to AD and 44 with AD dementia) with AD-typical cerebral hypometabolic pattern compared with 27 cognitively healthy elderly individuals without preclinical AD. These findings yield further evidence for the potential of sAPPβ in plasma as an AD biomarker candidate.

Keywords

Soluble amyloid precursor protein β (sAPPβ) Biomarker-underpinned diagnoses FDG-PET Upstream biomarkers Mild cognitive impairment Dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

406_2017_815_MOESM1_ESM.docx (26 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 26 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Panagiotis Alexopoulos
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Lena-Sophie Gleixner
    • 1
  • Lukas Werle
    • 1
    • 3
  • Felix Buhl
    • 1
  • Nathalie Thierjung
    • 1
  • Evangelia Giourou
    • 2
  • Simone M. Kagerbauer
    • 4
  • Philippos Gourzis
    • 2
  • Hubert Kübler
    • 5
  • Timo Grimmer
    • 1
  • Igor Yakushev
    • 6
  • Jan Martin
    • 4
  • Alexander Kurz
    • 1
  • Robert Perneczky
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
    • 10
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Klinikum Rechts der IsarTechnical University of MunichMunichGermany
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity Hospital of Rion, University of PatrasPatrasGreece
  3. 3.Max Planck Institute of PsychiatryMunichGermany
  4. 4.Department of Anaesthesiology, Klinikum Rechts der IsarTechnical University of MunichMunichGermany
  5. 5.Department of Urology, Klinikum Rechts der IsarTechnical University of MunichMunichGermany
  6. 6.Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Rechts der IsarTechnical University of MunichMunichGermany
  7. 7.Department of Psychiatry and PsychotherapyLudwig-Maximilians-Universität MünchenMunichGermany
  8. 8.Neuroepidemiology and Ageing Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public HealthThe Imperial College of Science, Technology and MedicineLondonUK
  9. 9.West London Mental Health NHS TrustLondonUK
  10. 10.German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) MunichMunichGermany

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