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The customer is always right? Subjective target symptoms and treatment preferences in patients with psychosis

Abstract

Clinicians and patients differ concerning the goals of treatment. Eighty individuals with schizophrenia were assessed online about which symptoms they consider the most important for treatment, as well as their experience with different interventions. Treatment of affective and neuropsychological problems was judged as more important than treatment of positive symptoms (p < 0.005). While most individuals had experience with Occupational and Sports Therapy, only a minority had received Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Family Therapy, and Psychoeducation with family members before. Patients appraised Talk, Psychoanalytic, and Art Therapy as well as Metacognitive Training as the most helpful treatments. Clinicians should carefully take into consideration patients’ preferences, as neglect of consumers’ views may compromise outcome and adherence to treatment.

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Correspondence to Steffen Moritz.

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Moritz, S., Berna, F., Jaeger, S. et al. The customer is always right? Subjective target symptoms and treatment preferences in patients with psychosis. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 267, 335–339 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00406-016-0694-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00406-016-0694-5

Keywords

  • Psychosis
  • Schizophrenia
  • Treatment preferences
  • Treatment gap