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Antioxidant activities of curcumin in allergic rhinitis

  • Rhinology
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Abstract

We investigated the antioxidant effects of curcumin in an experimental rat model of allergic rhinitis (AR). Female Wistar albino rats (n = 34) were divided randomly into four groups: healthy rats (control group, n = 8), AR with no treatment (AR + NoTr group, n = 10), AR with azelastine HCl treatment (AR + Aze group, n = 8), and AR with curcumin treatment (AR + Curc group, n = 8). On day 28, total blood IgE levels were measured. For measurement of antioxidant activity, the glutathione (GSH) level and catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were measured in both inferior turbinate tissue and serum. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured only in inferior turbinate tissue, and paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase (ARE) activities were measured only in serum. Statistically significant differences were found for all antioxidant measurements (GSH levels and CAT, SOD, GSH-Px activities in the serum and tissue, MDA levels in the tissue, and PON and ARE activities in the serum) between the four groups. In the curcumin group, serum SOD, ARE, and PON and tissue GSH values were higher than the control group. Moreover, tissue GSH levels and serum GSH-Px activities in the curcumin group were higher than in the AR + NoTr group. In the azelastine group, except MDA, antioxidant measurement values were lower than in the other groups. Curcumin may help to increase antioxidant enzymes and decrease oxidative stress in allergic rhinitis. We recommend curcumin to decrease oxidative stress in allergic rhinitis.

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Acknowledgments

With the exception of data collection, preparation of this paper, including design and planning, was supported by the Continuing Education and Scientific Research Association.

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Correspondence to Nuray Bayar Muluk.

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Author Niyazi Altıntoprak declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Murat Kar declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Mustafa Acar declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Mehmet Berkoz declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Nuray Bayar Muluk declares that she has no conflict of interest. Author Cemal Cingi declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

Animals were treated in compliance with relevant principles of the Declaration of Helsinki; and Ethics Committee Approval was also taken from Eskisehir Osmangazi University. All applicable international, national, and/or institutional guidelines for the care and use of animals were followed. Article does not contain studies with human participants.

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Informed consent is not needed, because Article does not contain studies with human participants.

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Altıntoprak, N., Kar, M., Acar, M. et al. Antioxidant activities of curcumin in allergic rhinitis. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 273, 3765–3773 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00405-016-4076-4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00405-016-4076-4

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