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Centering Pregnancy: practical tips for your practice

Abstract

Importance

With increased access to care, current health delivery systems will need expansion to meet higher demands and needs.

Purpose

To define Centering Pregnancy and practical tips for implementation into both private and academic practices.

Methods/evidence acquisition

Evidence was gathered through literature reviews.

Results

It was found that Centering Pregnancy offers a patient-centered, evidence-based approach to helping with access issues, as well as improving outcomes.

Conclusions

This article describes the benefits of Centering Pregnancy to the practice, the provider, and the patient.

Relevance

Practical implementation tips will be offered, with suggestions for negating common implementation barriers.

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Conflict of interest

Dr Julie DeCesare is a paid speaker for Bayer.

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Correspondence to Jessica R. Jackson.

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Cite this article

DeCesare, J.Z., Jackson, J.R. Centering Pregnancy: practical tips for your practice. Arch Gynecol Obstet 291, 499–507 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00404-014-3467-2

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Keywords

  • Centering Pregnancy
  • Group prenatal care
  • Obstetrics