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Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics

, Volume 284, Issue 2, pp 405–409 | Cite as

Clinicopathologic features of the nine patients with primary diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the breast

  • Mesut SekerEmail author
  • Ahmet Bilici
  • Basak Oven Ustaalioglu
  • Burçak Yilmaz
  • Banu Ozturk
  • Ali Ünal
  • Faysal Dane
  • Nuriye Yildirim Ozdemir
  • Emin Tamer Elkiran
  • Mehmet Emin Kalender
  • Mahmut Gumus
  • Mustafa Benekli
General Gynecology

Abstract

Background

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas of the breast are uncommon cancers that occur as either primary extranodal diseases or secondary localizations of a systemic disease. The term “primary breast lymphoma” (PBL) is used to define malignant lymphomas primarily occurring in the breast in the absence of previously detected lymphoma localizations. In this report, we analyzed nine patients with primary diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of breast.

Patients and methods

Patients with newly diagnosed PBLs treated between 1997 and 2009 in five institutions were retrospectively evaluated.

Results

The median age of the patients with PBL was 49 years (range 30–82 years), and four patients had left-sided and five had right-sided disease. All of the nine patients were classified as DLBCL. Five patients with DLBCL received chemotherapy followed by involved-field or elective-field radiotherapy and four received chemotherapy alone. Complete remission (CR) following primary treatment for all patients with PBL except for two cases was obtained. In two patients, recurrence occurred. At the median follow-up of 24.2 months, the 5-year OS rate was 76.2%. Univariate analysis indicated that age, ECOG PS, clinical stage, international prognostic index score, lactate dehydrogenase levels and the presence of B symptoms were not important prognostic factors in our study.

Conclusions

Our series contained a small sample size, but it is interesting because it included only DLBCL cases. However, definitive conclusions about treatment and follow-up options of patients cannot be made in such a small series of patients. There are very few reports of patients with PBL treated with R-CHOP rather than CHOP alone. The followup is probably still too short and sample size very few to know how R-CHOP compares with CHOP-treated patients in other series, but this is definitely worth looking at in more detail when reasonable median follow-up has been achieved and sample size are sufficient.

Keywords

Primary breast lymphoma Diffuse large B cell lymphoma Radiotherapy Chemotherapy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This manuscript was not supported by any financial help or other relationships.

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mesut Seker
    • 1
    • 8
    Email author
  • Ahmet Bilici
    • 1
  • Basak Oven Ustaalioglu
    • 1
  • Burçak Yilmaz
    • 1
  • Banu Ozturk
    • 2
  • Ali Ünal
    • 3
  • Faysal Dane
    • 4
  • Nuriye Yildirim Ozdemir
    • 5
  • Emin Tamer Elkiran
    • 6
  • Mehmet Emin Kalender
    • 7
  • Mahmut Gumus
    • 1
  • Mustafa Benekli
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Medical OncologyDr. Lutfi Kirdar Education and Research HospitalIstanbulTurkey
  2. 2.Department of Medical OncologyGazi University Medical SchoolAnkaraTurkey
  3. 3.Department of HematologyErciyes University Medical FacultyKayseriTurkey
  4. 4.Department of Medical OncologyMarmara University School MedicineIstanbulTurkey
  5. 5.Department of Medical OncologyMinistry of Health Ankara Research and Training HospitalAnkaraTurkey
  6. 6.Department of Medical OncologyFirat (Euphrates) University School of MedicineElazigTurkey
  7. 7.Department of Medical OncologyGaziantep University, Gaziantep Oncology HospitalGaziantepTurkey
  8. 8.IstanbulTurkey

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