Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics

, Volume 280, Issue 1, pp 3–6 | Cite as

Is oligohydramnios more common during the summer season?

  • Ilan Feldman
  • Michael Friger
  • Arnon Wiznitzer
  • Moshe Mazor
  • Gershon Holcberg
  • Eyal Sheiner
Original Article

Abstract

Objective

The main objective of the present study was to determine whether the summer season is a risk factor for oligohydramnios, by comparing the frequency of oligohydramnios during the summer months versus its frequency during the rest of the year.

Methods

A retrospective population-based study including all pregnancies of patients with oligohydramnios that delivered during the years 1988–2007 in a tertiary medical center was performed. All non-idiopathic causes for oligohydramnios were excluded from the analysis. Summer months were defined as May to August. A multiple logistic regression model was performed in order to control for confounders.

Results

During the study period, there were 191,558 deliveries of which 4,335 were diagnosed with oligohydramnios. Of these, 1,553 deliveries occurred during the summer months and 2,782 deliveries occurred during the rest of the year. Higher rates of oligohydramnios were found in the summer months as compared to the rest of the year: 2.5 versus 2.1%, odds ratio (OR) = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–1.3; P < 0.001. Using a multiple logistic regression model, controlling for confounding variables such as ethnicity, the summer season was noted as an independent risk factor for oligohydramnios (OR = 1.1, 95% CI 1.02–1.21; P < 0.001). Another independent risk factor for oligohydramnios was Bedouin ethnicity (OR = 1.3, 95% CI 1.2–1.4; P = 0.015).

Conclusions

Oligohydramnios is significantly more common during the summer months versus the rest of the year. Moreover, the summer season is an independent risk factor for oligohydramnios.

Keywords

Oligohydramnios Summer Seasonality Bedouins 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ilan Feldman
    • 1
  • Michael Friger
    • 2
  • Arnon Wiznitzer
    • 1
  • Moshe Mazor
    • 1
  • Gershon Holcberg
    • 1
  • Eyal Sheiner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Health SciencesSoroka University Medical Center, Ben Gurion University of the NegevBe’er-ShevaIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and Health Services Evaluation, Faculty of Health SciencesSoroka University Medical Center, Ben Gurion University of the NegevBe’er-ShevaIsrael

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