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Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 134, Issue 4, pp 671–673 | Cite as

Angiocentric glioma with MYB-QKI fusion located in the brainstem, rather than cerebral cortex

  • Emily Chan
  • Andrew W. Bollen
  • Deepika Sirohi
  • Jessica Van Ziffle
  • James P. Grenert
  • Cassie N. Kline
  • Tarik Tihan
  • Arie Perry
  • Nalin Gupta
  • David A. Solomon
Correspondence

Notes

Acknowledgements

C.N.K. is supported by the Campini Foundation, Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, and Cannonball Kids’ Cancer Foundation. D.A.S. is supported by NIH Director’s Early Independence Award (DP5 OD021403).

Author contributions

EC, AWB, TT, AP, and DAS performed pathologic assessment. DS, JVZ, JPG, and DAS performed genomic analysis. CNK provided neuro-oncology management. NG provided neurosurgical management. EC and DAS wrote the manuscript and created the figures. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests related to this case report.

Supplementary material

401_2017_1759_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (8.5 mb)
Supplementary Figs.  1 –4: Figure S1. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the angiocentric glioma located in the brainstem. Figure S2. Cytologic features of the angiocentric glioma located in the brainstem. Figure S3. Histologic features of the angiocentric glioma located in the brainstem. Figure S4. Chromosomal copy number plot for the angiocentric glioma located in the brainstem. (PDF 8656 kb)

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emily Chan
    • 1
  • Andrew W. Bollen
    • 1
  • Deepika Sirohi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jessica Van Ziffle
    • 1
    • 2
  • James P. Grenert
    • 1
    • 2
  • Cassie N. Kline
    • 3
  • Tarik Tihan
    • 1
  • Arie Perry
    • 1
    • 4
  • Nalin Gupta
    • 4
  • David A. Solomon
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Cancer Genomics LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of PediatricsUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.Department of Neurological SurgeryUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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