Optimale medikamentöse Therapie bei Typ‑2-Diabetikern mit einer koronaren Herzerkrankung – Update 2021

Optimal drug therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease—Update 2021

Zusammenfassung

Bei Patienten mit Typ‑2-Diabetes besteht eine erhöhte Wahrscheinlichkeit für die Entwicklung einer koronaren Arteriosklerose mit ihren klinischen Erscheinungsbildern, dem akuten oder dem chronischen Koronarsyndrom. Metabolische oder funktionelle Störungen wie Hyperlipidämie, Hyperglykämie sowie Hypertonie, endotheliale Dysfunktion und Alteration des Gerinnungssystems sind mit der Arteriosklerose von Typ‑2-Diabetikern vergesellschaftet und tragen zu deren erhöhtem kardiovaskulären Risiko bei. Ergänzend bleibt festzuhalten, dass die Arteriosklerose bei Typ‑2-Diabetikern etliche Unterschiede zu Nichtdiabetikern aufzeigt. Im vorliegende Update werden alle leitliniengerechten medikamentösen therapeutischen Möglichkeiten für Typ‑2-Diabetiker diskutiert – mit Fokus auf den starken klinischen Endpunkten wie Senkung der Zahl kardiovaskulärer Todesfälle, der Todesfälle insgesamt und der Krankenhauseinweisungen oder -wiedereinweisungen wegen Herzinsuffizienz.

Abstract

Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus exhibit an increased propensity for the development of coronary atherosclerosis with its clinical symptoms of acute or chronic coronary syndrome. Associated metabolic disorders like dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia as well as hypertension, endothelial dysfunction and hypercoagulability are implicated in the atherogenesis of these patients. In addition, atherogenesis in diabetic patients shows specific characteristics compared to nondiabetic subjects, all contributing to the increased risk of these patients. In this update, all guideline-based treatment options for type 2 diabetes are discussed with a focus on strong clinical endpoints such as reductions in cardiovascular death, death from any cause, and hospital admission or readmission for heart failure.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Literatur

  1. 1.

    Schernthaner G, Schernthaner GH (2012) Current treatment of type 2 diabetes. Internist 53(12):1399–1410

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  2. 2.

    RKI (2015) Gesundheitsberichterstattung des Bundes, S 468–469

    Google Scholar 

  3. 3.

    Di Angelantonio E et al (2015) Association of cardiometabolic multimorbidity with mortality. JAMA 314(1):52–60

    PubMed  Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  4. 4.

    Institut RK (2019) Nationale diabetes-surveillance. Robert Koch Institut (RKI), Berlin

    Google Scholar 

  5. 5.

    Marx N (2006) Pathophysiologie der  Arteriosklerose bei Diabetes mellitus. Clin Res Cardiol Suppl 1:31–38

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  6. 6.

    Inoue M, Tsugane S (2012) Insulin resistance and cancer: epidemiological evidence. Endocr Relat Cancer 19(5):F1–F8

    PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  7. 7.

    Cosentino F et al (2019) 2019 ESC Guidelines on diabetes, pre-diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases developed in collaboration with the EASD. Eur Heart J 41(2):255–323. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehz486

    Article  Google Scholar 

  8. 8.

    Schernthaner G et al (2010) Is the ADA/EASD algorithm for the management of type 2 diabetes (January 2009) based on evidence or opinion? A critical analysis. Diabetologia 53(7):1258–1269

    CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  9. 9.

    Marx N (2005) Pathophysiologie der Atherosklerose bei Diabetes mellitus. Diabetologe 1:84–90

    Article  Google Scholar 

  10. 10.

    Patel A et al (2008) Intensive blood glucose control and vascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes. N Engl J Med 358(24):2560–2572

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  11. 11.

    Dluhy RG, McMahon GT (2008) Intensive glycemic control in the ACCORD and ADVANCE trials. N Engl J Med 358(24):2630–2633

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  12. 12.

    Gerstein HC et al (2008) Effects of intensive glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes. N Engl J Med 358(24):2545–2559

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  13. 13.

    Duckworth W et al (2009) Glucose control and vascular complications in veterans with type 2 diabetes. N Engl J Med 360(2):129–139

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  14. 14.

    Schütt KA (2020) Evidence-based reduction of cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes. Herz 45(2):118–121

    PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  15. 15.

    Boussageon R et al (2011) Effect of intensive glucose lowering treatment on all cause mortality, cardiovascular death, and microvascular events in type 2 diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. BMJ 343:d4169

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  16. 16.

    Turnbull FM et al (2009) Intensive glucose control and macrovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes. Diabetologia 52(11):2288–2298

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  17. 17.

    Cosentino F et al (2020) 2019 ESC Guidelines on diabetes, pre-diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases developed in collaboration with the EASD. Eur Heart J 41(2):255–323

    PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  18. 18.

    Parhofer K et al (2019) Positionspapier zur Lipidtherapie bei Patienten mit Diabetes mellitus. Diabetologie 14(Suppl 2):S226–S231

    Google Scholar 

  19. 19.

    Landgraf R et al (2019) Therapie des Typ‑2-Diabetes. Diabetologie 14:S167–S187

    Article  Google Scholar 

  20. 20.

    Boniol M et al (2017) Physical activity and change in fasting glucose and HbA1c: a quantitative meta-analysis of randomized trials. Acta Diabetol 54(11):983–991

    CAS  PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  21. 21.

    Mach F et al (2020) 2019 ESC/EAS Guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias: lipid modification to reduce cardiovascular risk. Eur Heart J 41(1):111–188

    PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  22. 22.

    Rivas Rios JR et al (2018) Diabetes and antiplatelet therapy: from bench to bedside. Cardiovasc Diagn Ther 8(5):594–609

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  23. 23.

    Schütt K, Müller-Wieland D, Marx N (2019) Diabetes mellitus und Herz. Diabetologie 14:S232–234

    Article  Google Scholar 

  24. 24.

    Nesto RW (2004) Correlation between cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus: current concepts. Am J Med 116(Suppl 5A):11S–22S

    PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  25. 25.

    Yusuf S et al (2001) Effects of clopidogrel in addition to aspirin in patients with acute coronary syndromes without ST-segment elevation. N Engl J Med 345(7):494–502

    CAS  PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  26. 26.

    Committee CS (1996) A randomised, blinded, trial of clopidogrel versus aspirin in patients at risk of ischaemic events (CAPRIE). CAPRIE steering committee. Lancet 348(9038):1329–1339

    Article  Google Scholar 

  27. 27.

    Wiviott SD et al (2008) Greater clinical benefit of more intensive oral antiplatelet therapy with prasugrel in patients with diabetes mellitus in the trial to assess improvement in therapeutic outcomes by optimizing platelet inhibition with prasugrel-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 38. Circulation 118(16):1626–1636

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  28. 28.

    James S et al (2010) Ticagrelor vs. clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and diabetes: a substudy from the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial. Eur Heart J 31(24):3006–3016

    CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  29. 29.

    Eikelboom JW et al (2017) Rivaroxaban with or without aspirin in stable cardiovascular disease. N Engl J Med 377(14):1319–1330

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  30. 30.

    Williams B et al (2018) 2018 ESC/ESH Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension. Eur Heart J 39(33):3021–3104

    PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  31. 31.

    Schneider CA et al (2018) Moderne Antidiabetika in der Kardiologie. Aktuel Kardiol 7:286–291

    Article  Google Scholar 

  32. 32.

    Forst T et al (2013) Association of sulphonylurea treatment with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Diab Vasc Dis Res 10(4):302–314

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  33. 33.

    Rosenstock J et al (2019) Effect of Linagliptin vs Glimepiride on major adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes: the CAROLINA randomized clinical trial. JAMA 322(12):1155–1166. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2019.13772

    CAS  Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  34. 34.

    Kaul S et al (2010) Thiazolidinedione drugs and cardiovascular risks: a science advisory from the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology Foundation. Circulation 121(16):1868–1877

    PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  35. 35.

    Scheen AJ (2012) DPP‑4 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes: a critical review of head-to-head trials. Diabetes Metab 38(2):89–101

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  36. 36.

    Scirica BM et al (2013) Saxagliptin and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. N Engl J Med 369(14):1317–1326

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  37. 37.

    Pfeffer MA et al (2015) Lixisenatide in patients with type 2 diabetes and acute coronary syndrome. N Engl J Med 373(23):2247–2257

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  38. 38.

    Holman RR et al (2017) Effects of once-weekly exenatide on cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes. N Engl J Med 377(13):1228–1239

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  39. 39.

    Zelniker TA et al (2019) Comparison of the effects of Glucagon-like peptide receptor agonists and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors for prevention of major adverse cardiovascular and renal outcomes in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Circulation 139(17):2022–2031

    CAS  PubMed  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  40. 40.

    Marso SP et al (2016) Liraglutide and cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes. N Engl J Med 375(4):311–322

    CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  41. 41.

    Bakris GL et al (2009) Renal sodium-glucose transport: role in diabetes mellitus and potential clinical implications. Kidney Int 75(12):1272–1277

    CAS  PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  42. 42.

    Zinman B et al (2015) Empagliflozin, cardiovascular outcomes, and mortality in type 2 diabetes. N Engl J Med 373(22):2117–2128

    CAS  PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  43. 43.

    McMurray JJV et al (2019) Dapagliflozin in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. N Engl J Med 381(21):1995–2008

    CAS  PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  44. 44.

    Packer M et al (2021) Effect of empagliflozin on the clinical stability of patients with heart failure and a reduced ejection fraction: the EMPEROR-reduced trial. Circulation 143(4):326–336

    CAS  PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  45. 45.

    Davies MJ et al (2018) Management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, 2018. A consensus report by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). Diabetes Care 41(12):2669–2701

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  46. 46.

    Wu JH et al (2016) Effects of sodium-glucose cotransporter‑2 inhibitors on cardiovascular events, death, and major safety outcomes in adults with type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 4(5):411–419

    CAS  PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  47. 47.

    Arnold SV et al (2020) Clinical management of stable coronary artery disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation 141(19):e779–e806. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000766

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Klaus Edel.

Ethics declarations

Interessenkonflikt

Gemäß den Richtlinien des Springer Medizin Verlags werden Autoren und Wissenschaftliche Leitung im Rahmen der Manuskripterstellung und Manuskriptfreigabe aufgefordert, eine vollständige Erklärung zu ihren finanziellen und nichtfinanziellen Interessen abzugeben.

Autoren

K. Edel: Finanzielle Interessen: Letzte 5 Jahre, jedoch nicht 2020: Daiichi Sankyo (Referentenhonorar, Reisekostenübernahme 1 Mal pro Jahr), Novartis (Referentenhonorar, Reisekostenübernahme, seit 2017, 3 Mal pro Jahr Referent, 1 Mal Reisekosten), nächste 12 Monate: keine. – B. Nichtfinanzielle Interessen: Chefarzt der Abteilung für kardiologische Rehabilitation und Prävention, Herz-Kreislauf-Zentrum Klinikum Hersfeld-Rotenburg GmbH | Mitgliedschaften: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Kardiologie (DGK), Deutsche Gesellschaft für Innere Medizin (DGIM), Deutsche Diabetes-Gesellschaft (DDG), Deutsche Hochdruckliga (DHL), Vorstandsmitglied von Defibrillator (ICD) Deutschland e. V., Landessportarzt für Präventions- und Rehabilitationssport beim hessischen Behinderten- und Rehabilitationssportverband (HBRS), Med. Kommission beim HBRS, leitender Landessportarzt Deutscher Behindertensportverband e. V. – National Paralympic Committee Germany. R. Mootz: A. Finanzielle Interessen: R. Mootz gibt an, dass kein finanzieller Interessenkonflikt besteht. – B. Nichtfinanzielle Interessen: Oberarzt, Klinik für Kardiologie und Angiologie, Herz-Kreislaufzentrum, Klinikum Hersfeld Rotenburg | Mitgliedschaften: DGIM, DDG.

Wissenschaftliche Leitung

Die vollständige Erklärung zum Interessenkonflikt der Wissenschaftlichen Leitung finden Sie am Kurs der zertifizierten Fortbildung auf www.springermedizin.de/cme.

Der Verlag

erklärt, dass für die Publikation dieser CME-Fortbildung keine Sponsorengelder an den Verlag fließen.

Für diesen Beitrag wurden von den Autoren keine Studien an Menschen oder Tieren durchgeführt. Für die aufgeführten Studien gelten die jeweils dort angegebenen ethischen Richtlinien.

Additional information

figureqr

QR-Code scannen & Beitrag online lesen

Wissenschaftliche Leitung

H. Niehaus, Hannover

A. J. Rastan, Rotenburg a.d. Fulda

CME-Fragebogen

CME-Fragebogen

Wie hoch ist die Zahl der Neuerkrankungen an Diabetes in Deutschland pro Jahr?

100.000 Menschen erkranken jährlich neu an Diabetes.

200.000 Menschen erkranken jährlich neu an Diabetes.

250.000 Menschen erkranken jährlich neu an Diabetes.

300.000 Menschen erkranken jährlich neu an Diabetes.

500.000 Menschen erkranken jährlich neu an Diabetes.

Was gilt für Menschen mit Typ-2-Diabetes?

Sie haben eine reine Zuckerkrankheit.

Sie sind an einer komplexen Stoffwechselstörung erkrankt.

Sie entwickeln sehr häufig einen Insulinmangel.

Sie sollten einen HbA1c-Wert von unter 6 % haben um Ihr KHK-Risiko zu minimieren.

Sie können durch die Therapie des Diabetes an Gewicht zunehmen ohne dass ihr KHK-Risiko ansteigt.

Welche Therapieoption sollte erst nach Ausschöpfung aller anderen therapeutischen Optionen bei Typ-2-Diabetes zum Einsatz kommen? Auf welchen Grundpfeiler der Therapie bei Typ-2-Diabetes würden Sie verzichten?

Herzgesunde Ernährung

Ausdauer- und Krafttraining

Schulung

Gewichtsreduktion

Insulin

Welche Aussage trifft bezüglich der Senkung des kardiovaskulären Risikos bei Typ-2-Diabetes zu?

Intensive Blutzuckersenkung wird als vordergründige Maßnahme empfohlen.

Häufige Hypoglykämien sollten durch stramme Blutzuckereinstellung erzwungen werden.

Bei Übergewicht ist Gewichtsreduktion sehr sinnvoll.

Die Blutdruckeinstellung kann vernachlässigt werden.

Möglichst wenig Bewegung wird empfohlen zur Vermeidung von Hypoglykämien.

Wie ist die Beeinflussung des kardiovaskulären Risikos durch Typ-2-Diabetes einzuschätzen?

Typ-2-Diabetes beeinflusst das kardiovaskuläre Risiko nicht.

Eine strikte Blutzuckerkontrolle normalisiert das kardiovaskuläre Risiko bei Typ-2-Diabetes.

Typ-2-Diabetiker haben das gleiche kardiovaskuläre Risiko wie Nichtdiabetiker.

Typ-2-Diabetes ist ein relevanter Risikofaktor für die Entwicklung von kardiovaskulären Erkrankungen.

Kardiovaskuläre Outcome-Studien zu blutzuckersenkenden Diabetesmedikamenten haben diesbezüglich keinerlei Nutzen gezeigt.

Welche der folgenden Aussagen zu SGLT‑2 Inhibitoren ist richtig?

SGLT‑2 Inhibitoren erhöhen den Blutglukosespiegel.

SGLT‑2 Inhibitoren reduzieren die Glukoseausscheidung über die Niere.

SGLT‑2 Inhibitoren erhöhen das Körpergewicht.

SGLT‑2 Inhibitoren induzieren eine osmotische Diurese.

SGLT‑2 Inhibitoren reduzieren den Ruhepuls.

Was trifft für die Therapie mit CSE-Hemmern bei Typ-2-Diabetikern zu?

Die zielwertorientierte Strategie und die feste-Dosis-Strategie sind bei der Therapie mit Statinen gleichwertig.

Je niedriger der LDL-Wert eingestellt ist, umso größer ist der prognostische Nutzen der Statintherapie.

Bei Unverträglichkeit der Statine kann auf Ezetimib zurückgegriffen werden mit einem höheren prognostischen Benefit.

Fibrate entwickeln ihre positive Wirkung überwiegend über pleiotrope Effekte.

Diabetes-Patienten mit LDL-Werten < 100 mg/dl brauchen keine Statintherapie.

Welche Therapie sollte der 70-jährige Typ-2-Diabetiker mit Herzinsuffizienz bei stabiler KHK aus der im Beitrag vorgestellten Kasuistik erhalten?

Aufgrund der niedrigen Herzfrequenz sollte der Betablocker abgesetzt werden.

Dapagliflozin sollte wegen des erheblichen Zusatznutzens zusätzlich verordnet werden.

ASS kann in dieser Situation abgesetzt werden.

Wegen der hypertensiven Belastungsreaktion sollte die Ramipril-Dosis verdoppelt werden.

Bei erhöhtem Blutdruck und peripheren Ödemen sollte der Patient aus prognostischen Gründen zusätzlich Hydrochlorothiazid erhalten.

Welches Antidiabetikum kommt für den Patienten aus der im Beitrag vorgestellten Kasuistik in Betracht?

Sulfonylharnstoffe und Metformin sind gleichwertige Diabetesmedikamente.

Metformin ist gemäß Leitlinie das Diabetes-Medikament der ersten Wahl und sollte nur bei Vorliegen von Kontraindikationen ersetzt werden.

Glitazone sind bei herzkranken Diabetikern die Antidiabetika der ersten Wahl.

Bisherigen Daten zufolge vermindert Insulin die Mortalität herzkranker Diabetiker deutlich.

Studien zeigten für GLP‑1 Rezeptoragonisten ein erhebliches Hypoglykämierisiko.

Welche Antidiabetika-Gruppe senkt die Hospitalisierungsrate aufgrund von Herzinsuffizienz signifikant?

GLP‑1 Rezeptoragonisten

Gliptine (DDP‑4 Hemmer)

Sulfonylharnstoffe

Insuline

Gliflozine (SGLT‑2 Inhibitoren)

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Edel, K., Mootz, R. Optimale medikamentöse Therapie bei Typ‑2-Diabetikern mit einer koronaren Herzerkrankung – Update 2021. Z Herz- Thorax- Gefäßchir (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00398-021-00446-x

Download citation

Schlüsselwörter

  • Blutzuckersenkende Wirkstoffe
  • Arteriosklerose
  • Personalisierte Medizin
  • SGLT‑2-Hemmer
  • GLP‑1-Rezeptor

Keywords

  • Hypoglycemic agents
  • Arteriosclerosis
  • Personalized medicine
  • SGLT‑2 inhibitor
  • GLP‑1 receptor