Advertisement

Rheologica Acta

, Volume 57, Issue 5, pp 397–404 | Cite as

Rheological behavior in the transient state of PP/EPDM blends with carbon nanofillers

  • Roberto Zitzumbo-Guzman
  • Felipe Avalos-Belmontes
  • Luis F. Ramos-De Valle
  • Jose C. Ortiz-Cisneros
  • Sergio Alonso-Romero
  • Anayansi Estrada-Monje
Original Contribution
  • 141 Downloads

Abstract

The rheological properties in the transient state of PP/EPDM blends with carbon nanofillers had been studied. The carbon nanofillers were incorporated into molten EPDM in an internal mixer at 150 °C. The rheological variables were determined in rotational rheometry at constant temperature of 200 °C. The results suggest that the magnitude of the difference of the normal stress differences (N1-N2) of PP/EPDM blends through the time, with and without nanofillers, and has a transition cycle from positive to negative values and vice versa, at constant and at zero shear rate in previously sheared samples. At constant shear rate, the transition cycle is random; meanwhile, it is constant at zero shear rate. This behavior is attributed to the polymeric chain movement, considering that the sheared samples have two molecular reorder processes: an immediate mechanism and another one slower. The fastest reorder process is attributed to the polymeric chains entanglement forming non-stable and stressed molecular structures. In the other hand, the second process is referred to the molecular mobility that takes place inside the stressed entangled polymer, in such a way that its structure tends to molecular stability as the rest time increases.

Keywords

Rheological properties Normal stress differences PP/EPDM blends Nanocomposites 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to express our great thanks to the National Council of Science and Technology of Mexico (CONACYT) for the financial support given to Dr. R. Zitzumbo to collaborate in this research during his sabbatical stay with the project number 266301 of the 2015 call.

References

  1. Baek SG, Magda JJ, Cementwala S (1993a) Normal stress differences in liquid crystalline hydroxypropylcellulose solutions. J Rheol 37:935–945CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Baek SG, Magda JJ, Larson RG (1993b) Rheological differences among liquid-crystalline polymers. I. The first and second normal stress differences of PBG solutions. J Rheol 37(6):1201–1224CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Hobbie EK, Fry DJ (2007) Rheology of concentrated carbon nanotube suspensions. J Chem Phys 126:124907CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Jensen EA, Christiansen J d C (2008) Measurements of first and second normal stress differences in a polymer melt. J Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech 148:41–46CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Kiss G, Porter RS (1978) Rheology of concentrated solutions of poly(γ-benzyl-glutamate). J Polym Sci Polym Symp 65:193–211CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Luo Y, Xin C, Zheng D, Li Z, Zhu W, Wu S, Zheng Q, He Y (2015) Effect of processing history on the rheological properties, crystallization and foamability of branched polypropylene. J Polym Res 22:117CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Mall-Gleissle SE, Gleissle W, McKinley GH, Buggisch H (2002) The normal stress behaviour of suspensions with viscoelastic matrix fluids. Rheol Acta 41:61–76CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Marrucci G, Guido S (1995) Shear flow rheology of liquid crystalline polymers. Int J Polym Anal Charact 1:191–199CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Morrison FA (2001) Understanding rheology. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  10. Narimissa E, Rahmanm A, Gupta RK, Kao N, Bhattacharya SN (2014) Anomalous first normal stress difference behavior of polymer nanocomposites and liquid crystalline polymer composites. Polym Eng Sci 54(6):1300–1312CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Takahashi T, Takimoto J, Koyama K (1999) Elongational viscosity for miscible and immiscible polymer blends. II. Blends with a small amount of UHMW polymer. J Appl Polym Sci 72(7):961–969CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Tao YG, Otter WKD, Briels WJ (2006) Shear viscosities and normal stress differences of rigid liquid-crystalline polymers. Macromolecules 39:5939–5945CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Tiziani S, Vodovotz Y (2005) Rheological effects of soy protein addition to tomato juice. Food Hydrocoll 19:45–52CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Zitzumbo-Guzman R, Alonso-Romero S, Avalos-Belmonte F, Ortíz-Cisneros JC, López-Manchado MA, Arroyo M (2006) Structural analysis of nanocomposites based on HDPE/EPDM blends. J Nanosci Nanotechnol 6(2):331–336CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto Zitzumbo-Guzman
    • 1
  • Felipe Avalos-Belmontes
    • 2
  • Luis F. Ramos-De Valle
    • 3
  • Jose C. Ortiz-Cisneros
    • 2
  • Sergio Alonso-Romero
    • 1
  • Anayansi Estrada-Monje
    • 1
  1. 1.CIATEC A.C.LeonMexico
  2. 2.Facultad de Ciencias QuímicasUniversidad Autónoma de Coahuila (FCQ-UAC)SaltilloMexico
  3. 3.CIQASaltilloMexico

Personalised recommendations