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Acute consumption of a shake containing cashew and Brazil nuts did not affect appetite in overweight subjects: a randomized, cross-over study

Abstract

Purpose

Evidence from epidemiological and clinical studies suggests that nut consumption provides satiety and may contribute to the management of obesity. However, the effect of acute intake of nuts on appetite responses remains unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute effect of a shake containing 30 g of cashew nuts (Anacardium occidentale L.) and 15 g of Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K) on appetite responses in overweight subjects.

Methods

This was a clinical, randomized, controlled, single-blind, cross-over, pilot study. On two non-consecutive test days, 15 subjects received a shake containing nuts, and a shake absent of nuts matched for energy and macronutrient content. Subjective appetite sensation was evaluated by visual analogue scales (VAS). Food intake was measured by weighing the lunch served at the end of each morning-test, which subjects ate ad libitum. Total energy intake was estimated by food records. This study is registered on the Brazilian Registers of Clinical Trials—ReBEC (protocol: U1111-1203-9891).

Results

We observed no significant difference in subjective appetite sensations between the groups. Food intake at lunch, as well as energy intake throughout the day also did not differ between the treatments.

Conclusion

Our results suggest that the acute intake of a shake containing nuts was not able to enhance satiety, compared to a shake matched for energy and macronutrient content. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the satiety mechanisms of nuts intake.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de Minas Gerais (FAPEMIG, Brazil) and Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq, Brazil) for financial support. This study was financed in part by the Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior—Brasil (CAPES)—Finance Code 001.

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MACC, HHMH, APSC, DMUPR, and JB: contributed to the conception and design of the project, data interpretation, and analysis, writing and review of the final manuscript. AS and LLO: contributed to data analysis and interpretation, as well as writing and review of the final manuscript. All authors have approved the final article.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Josefina Bressan.

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Costa, M.A.d., Hermsdorff, H.H.M., Caldas, A.P.S. et al. Acute consumption of a shake containing cashew and Brazil nuts did not affect appetite in overweight subjects: a randomized, cross-over study. Eur J Nutr 60, 4321–4330 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-021-02560-w

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-021-02560-w

Keywords

  • Brazil nuts
  • Cashew nuts
  • Obesity
  • Satiety
  • Hunger
  • Food intake