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Quail (Coturnix japonica) egg yolk bioactive components attenuate streptozotocin-induced testicular damage and oxidative stress in diabetic rats

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Abstract

Introduction

The testicular milieu is the machinery for the metabolism of testosterone in the male reproductive system.

Purpose

The dysfunction of this highly regenerating system is inevitable in the condition of glucose imbalance as a result of insulin machinery impairment. Therefore, it is imperative to recommend dietary intervention for attenuating the testicular dysfunction and oxidative stress resulting from STZ-induction of diabetes.

Methods

STZ-induced diabetes (65 mg/kg, ip) was treated with QEYEM (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg/day) and quercetin (50 mg/kg/day) for 7weeks. In serum, glucose, testosterone, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were estimated, and in testis, tissues TBARS, sulfhydryl groups, nucleic acids and total protein (TP) levels were estimated. SOD, CAT and GST activities were also determined in testicular cells. Histopathological changes were evaluated in a cross-section of testis.

Results

Testosterone concentration was decreased while pro-inflammatory markers were increased in STZ-assaulted rats. Treatment using QEYEM of diabetic rats corrected assaults and reverse significantly the diabetic conditions. QEYEM-treated groups showed significant inhibition of TBARS levels and elevation of testicular GSH, NP-SH, total protein (TP) and nucleic acids—DNA and RNA levels. The QEYEM administration reversed the inhibited activities of SOD, CAT and GST in testicular cells in diabetic rats. The characterization of the extract carried out through HPLC analytical techniques revealed vitamins A, D and E concentrations of 0.645, 0.012 and 6.3 mg/100 g, respectively.

Conclusion

QEYEM supplementation to STZ-induced diabetic rats for seven (7) consecutive weeks is a potential intervention against testicular damage in adult diabetic rats, probably by decreasing oxidative stress.

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Correspondence to Gideon Oludare Oladipo.

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Oladipo, G.O., Nlekerem, C.M., Ibukun, E.O. et al. Quail (Coturnix japonica) egg yolk bioactive components attenuate streptozotocin-induced testicular damage and oxidative stress in diabetic rats. Eur J Nutr 57, 2857–2867 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1554-4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1554-4

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