Vitamin D receptor FokI, BsmI, and TaqI polymorphisms and susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis

A meta-analysis

FokI, BsmI und TaqI-Polymorphismus des Vitamin-D-Rezeptors und Anfälligkeit für rheumatoide Arthritis

Eine Metaanalyse

Abstract

Objective

The aim of this study was to explore whether vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Methods

Meta-analyses were conducted on the associations between the VDR FokI, BsmI, and TaqI polymorphisms and RA.

Results

A total of seven studies were considered in the meta-analysis, involving a total of 923 patients and 912 controls. Meta-analysis of the VDR FokI polymorphism showed no association between RA and the F allele in the entire studied cohort (odds ratio, OR = 1.1740, 95 % confidence interval, CI = 0.994–1.387, p = 0.059). However, stratification by ethnicity revealed a significant association between the F allele and RA in Europeans (OR = 1.402, 95 % CI = 1.126–1.746, p = 0.003). Furthermore, an association was found between RA and the VDR FokI polymorphism using both the dominant model and homozygote contrast. Meta-analysis revealed no association between RA and the VDR BsmI B and TaqI T polymorphisms in Europeans (OR for the B allele = 1.065, 95 % CI = 0.911–1.245, p = 0.427; OR for the T allele = 1.065, 95 % CI = 0.834–1.361, p = 0.613).

Conclusion

This meta-analysis suggests that the VDR FokI polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to RA in European populations.

Zusammenfassung

Ziel

Ziel der vorliegenden Studie war es zu untersuchen, ob Vitamin-D-Rezeptor(VDR)-Polymorphismen mit der Anfälligkeit für rheumatoide Arthritis (RA) in Zusammenhang stehen.

Methoden

Es wurden Metaanalysen zu den Assoziationen zwischen den FokI-, BsmI- und TaqI-Polymorphismen des VDR und RA durchgeführt.

Ergebnisse

In der Metaanalyse wurden 7 Studien berücksichtigt, die 923 Patienten und 912 Kontrollen umfassten. Die Metaanalyse des VDR-FokI-Polymorphismus ergab keine Assoziation zwischen RA und dem F-Allel in der gesamten untersuchten Kohorte (Odds Ratio, OR = 1,1740; 95 %-Konfidenzintervall, 95%-KI = 0,994–1,387; p = 0,059). Jedoch zeigte die Stratifizierung nach Ethnizität eine signifikante Assoziation zwischen dem F-Allel und RA bei Europäern (OR = 1,402; 95 %-KI = 1,126–1,746; p = 0,003). Darüber hinaus wurde eine Assoziation zwischen RA und dem VDR-FokI-Polymorphismus anhand des dominanten Modells und des homozygoten Kontrasts festgestellt. Wie die Metaanalyse zeigte, bestand keine Assoziation zwischen RA und den VDR-BsmI-B- und -TaqI-T-Polymorphismen bei Europäern (OR für das B-Allel = 1,065; 95 %-KI = 0,911–1,245; p = 0,427; OR für das T-Allel = 1,065; 95 %-KI = 0,834–1,361; p = 0,613).

Schlussfolgerung

Die vorliegende Metaanalyse liefert Hinweise darauf, dass der VDR-FokI-Polymorphismus mit der Anfälligkeit für RA in der europäischen Bevölkerung assoziiert ist.

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Acknowledgements

This study was supported in part by a grant from the Korea Healthcare Technology R&D Project, Ministry for Health and Welfare, Republic of Korea (HI13C2124).

Compliance with ethical guidelines

Conflict of interest. G.G. Song, S.-C. Bae, and Y.H. Lee state that there are no conflicts of interest.

The accompanying manuscript does not include studies on humans or animals.

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Correspondence to Y.H. Lee MD, PhD.

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Song, G., Bae, SC. & Lee, Y. Vitamin D receptor FokI, BsmI, and TaqI polymorphisms and susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. Z Rheumatol 75, 322–329 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00393-015-1581-6

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Keywords

  • Immune system
  • Autoimmune diseases
  • Hormone receptors, nuclear
  • MEDLINE
  • Linkage disequilibrium

Schlüsselwörter

  • Immunsystem
  • Autoimmunkrankheit
  • Hormonrezeptoren, nukleäre
  • MEDLINE
  • Kopplungsungleichgewicht