Advertisement

Pediatric Surgery International

, Volume 29, Issue 6, pp 655–658 | Cite as

Case report of bilateral adrenal leiomyoma with review of literature

  • Sandesh V. Parelkar
  • Nandita Pratap Sampat
  • Beejal V. Sanghvi
  • Prashant B. JoshiEmail author
  • Subrat Kumar Sahoo
  • Jiwan Lal Patel
  • Sanjay N. Oak
Case Report

Introduction

Adrenal leiomyomas (AL)s are rare benign tumors; only 16 cases have been reported overall including the adult population, three of which had bilateral involvement [1]. In the paediatric age group, only four cases have been reported, two being bilateral [1, 2]. ALs are usually asymptomatic. They can be associated with immunodeficiency. We report a paediatric case of bilateral large multilobed AL. The literature on paediatric ALs has also been reviewed.

Case report

An 11-year-old girl was presented with intermittent chest and abdominal pain for a year. The child was normotensive. She had scars of healed cutaneous viral infection on the right side of the chest. The abdomen was soft with no palpable lump.

An abdominal ultrasound revealed bilateral supra-renal masses. Computerized tomography (CT) scan showed the presence of well-defined lesions of size 8.5 × 6.5 and 3.3 × 3 cm on the right and left side, respectively (Fig.  1). The lesions showed central areas of necrosis...

Keywords

Inferior Vena Cava Standard Uptake Value Leiomyomas Tracer Uptake Adrenal Mass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Monse Nahid, Dehghani Masoud et al (2011) Leiomyoma of the adrenal gland presenting as an incidentaloma. Arch Iran Med 14(6):419–422Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lin J, Wasco MJ et al (2007) Leiomyoma of the adrenal presenting as a non-functioning incidentaloma. Endocr Pathol 18:239–243PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lack EE (2007) Smooth muscle neoplasms. In: Lack EE (ed) AFIP Atlas of tumor pathology. Tumors of the adrenal gland and extra-adrenal paraganglia. ARP press, Silver Spring, p 201Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Jimenez-Heffernan JA, Hardisson D et al (1995) Adrenal gland leiomyoma in a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Pediatr Pathol Lab Med 15:923–929PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Rosenfeld DL, Girgis WS et al (1999) Bilateral smooth muscle tumors of the adrenals in a child with AIDS. Pediatr Radiol 29:376–378PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Petrilli G, Lorenzi L et al. (2011) Epstein-Barr virus associated adrenal smooth muscle tumors and disseminated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a child with common variable immunodeficiency: a case report and review of literature. Int J Surg Pathol. doi: 10.1177/1066896911399901
  7. 7.
    Françoise M, Jacques N et al (1991) Leiomyoma of the suprarenal gland in a child with ataxia telangiectasia. Pediatr Hematol Oncol 8:235–241CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Chura Justin, Alexander M et al (2007) Positron emission technology and leiomyomas: clinicopathologic analysis of three cases of PET scan-positive leiomyomas and literature review. Gynecol Oncol 104:247–252PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Bail LB, Morel D et al (1996) Cystic smooth muscle tumor of the liver and spleen associated with Epstein-Barr virus after renal transplantation. Am J Surg Pathol 20(11):1418–1425PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Chadarévian JP, Wolk JH et al (1997) A newly recognized cause of wheezing: AIDS related bronchial leiomyomas. Pediatr Pulmonol 24:106–110PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Barbashina V, Heller DS et al (2000) Splenic smooth-muscle tumors in children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: report of two cases of this unusual location with evidence of an association with Epstein-Barr virus. Virchows Arch 436(2):138–139PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Monforte MH, Kapoor N et al (2003) Epstein-Barr virus-associated leiomyomatosis and post transplant lymphoproliferaltive disorder in a child with severe combined immunodeficiency: case report and review of the literature. Pediatr Dev Pathol 6(5):449–457CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Demirel S, Erk O et al (1997) Multiple vascular leiomyomas involving bilateral adrenal glands, spleen, and epicardium, associated with bilateral testicular microlithiasis and empty sella turcica. J Pediatr Surg 32(9):1365–1367PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Rubin DR, Kiyabu M (1992) Multiple smooth muscle tumours of the colon and adrenal gland in an adult with AIDS. AJR Am J Roentgenol 159:545–546CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Wachsberg RH, Cho KC et al (1994) Two leiomyomas of the liver in an adult with AIDS: CT and MR appearance. J Comput Assist Tomogr 18:156–157PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Gibbs KE, White A et al (2005) Laparoscopic management of an adrenal leiomyoma in an AIDS patient. A case report and review of the literature. JSLS 9:345–348PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Chang TH, Lee YC et al (2006) Adrenal leiomyoma treated by hand assisted laparoscopic adrenalectomy: a case report. Kaohsiung J Med Sci 22:575–579PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandesh V. Parelkar
    • 1
  • Nandita Pratap Sampat
    • 1
  • Beejal V. Sanghvi
    • 1
  • Prashant B. Joshi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Subrat Kumar Sahoo
    • 1
  • Jiwan Lal Patel
    • 1
  • Sanjay N. Oak
    • 1
  1. 1.Seth GSMC and King Edward VII memorial hospitalMumbaiIndia

Personalised recommendations